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Volume 38(1); February 2023
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Namgok Lecture 2022
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Incretin and Pancreatic β-Cell Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Chang Ho Ahn, Tae Jung Oh, Se Hee Min, Young Min Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):1-9.   Published online February 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.103
  • 3,248 View
  • 354 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
To maintain normal glucose homeostasis after a meal, it is essential to secrete an adequate amount of insulin from pancreatic β-cells. However, if pancreatic β-cells solely depended on the blood glucose level for insulin secretion, a surge in blood glucose levels would be inevitable after the ingestion of a large amount of carbohydrates. To avoid a deluge of glucose in the bloodstream after a large carbohydrate- rich meal, enteroendocrine cells detect the amount of nutrient absorption from the gut lumen and secrete incretin hormones at scale. Since insulin secretion in response to incretin hormones occurs only in a hyperglycemic milieu, pancreatic β-cells can secrete a “Goldilocks” amount of insulin (i.e., not too much and not too little) to keep the blood glucose level in the normal range. In this regard, pancreatic β-cell sensitivity to glucose and incretin hormones is crucial for maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. In this Namgok lecture 2022, we review the effects of current anti-diabetic medications on pancreatic β-cell sensitivity to glucose and incretin hormones.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Initial Combination Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes
    Ji Yoon Kim, Nam Hoon Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(1): 23.     CrossRef
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Review Articles
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Big Data Research in the Field of Endocrine Diseases Using the Korean National Health Information Database
Sun Wook Cho, Jung Hee Kim, Han Seok Choi, Hwa Young Ahn, Mee Kyoung Kim, Eun Jung Rhee
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):10-24.   Published online February 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.102
  • 3,620 View
  • 259 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
The Korean National Health Information Database (NHID) contains big data combining information obtained from the National Health Insurance Service and health examinations. Data are provided in the form of a cohort, and the NHID can be used to conduct longitudinal studies and research on rare diseases. Moreover, data on the cause and date of death are provided by Statistics Korea. Research and publications based on the NHID have increased explosively in the field of endocrine disorders. However, because the data were not collected for research purposes, studies using the NHID have limitations, particularly the need for the operational definition of diseases. In this review, we describe the characteristics of the Korean NHID, operational definitions of endocrine diseases used for research, and an overview of recent studies in endocrinology using the Korean NHID.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations Between Physical Activity and the Risk of Hip Fracture Depending on Glycemic Status: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Kyoung Min Kim, Kyoung Jin Kim, Kyungdo Han, Yumie Rhee
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(3): e1194.     CrossRef
  • Weight change in patients with new‐onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with remission: Comprehensive real‐world data
    Jinyoung Kim, Bongseong Kim, Mee Kyoung Kim, Ki‐Hyun Baek, Ki‐Ho Song, Kyungdo Han, Hyuk‐Sang Kwon
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(2): 567.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes severity and the risk of depression: A nationwide population-based study
    Yunjung Cho, Bongsung Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Kyungdo Han, Mee Kyoung Kim
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 351: 694.     CrossRef
  • Information Bias Might Exaggerate Lung Cancer Risk of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Nobuyuki Horita, Kaoru Takase-Minegishi
    Journal of Thoracic Oncology.2024; 19(2): 348.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes Duration, Cholesterol Levels, and Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes
    Mee Kyoung Kim, Kyu Na Lee, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diabetes severity is strongly associated with the risk of active tuberculosis in people with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide cohort study with a 6-year follow-up
    Ji Young Kang, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee, Mee Kyoung Kim
    Respiratory Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Research on obesity using the National Health Information Database: recent trends
    Eun-Jung Rhee
    Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy.2023; 5(2): 35.     CrossRef
  • Pituitary Diseases and COVID-19 Outcomes in South Korea: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Jeonghoon Ha, Kyoung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Lim, Keeho Song, Gi Hyeon Seo
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(14): 4799.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Pancreatic Cancer and Use of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Propensity Score-Matching Analysis
    Mee Kyoung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Soon Jib Yoo
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(4): 426.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, Treatment Status, and Comorbidities of Hyperthyroidism in Korea from 2003 to 2018: A Nationwide Population Study
    Hwa Young Ahn, Sun Wook Cho, Mi Young Lee, Young Joo Park, Bon Seok Koo, Hang-Seok Chang, Ka Hee Yi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(4): 436.     CrossRef
  • Is Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms? A Population-Based, Nested Case–Control Study from Korea
    Hyeree Park, Sun Wook Cho, Sung Ho Lee, Kangmin Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Jeong Eun Kim, Aesun Shin, Won-Sang Cho
    Thyroid®.2023; 33(12): 1483.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Cause-Specific Mortality across Glucose Spectrum in Elderly People: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Joonyub Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kee-Ho Song, Soon Jib Yoo, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(5): 525.     CrossRef
  • Risk of depression in patients with acromegaly in Korea (2006-2016): a nationwide population-based study
    Shinje Moon, Sangmo Hong, Kyungdo Han, Cheol-Young Park
    European Journal of Endocrinology.2023; 189(3): 363.     CrossRef
  • Cumulative effect of impaired fasting glucose on the risk of dementia in middle-aged and elderly people: a nationwide cohort study
    Jin Yu, Kyu-Na Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Cumulative Exposure to High γ-Glutamyl Transferase Levels and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Han-Sang Baek, Bongseong Kim, Seung-Hwan Lee, Dong-Jun Lim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Sang-Ah Chang, Kyungdo Han, Jae-Seung Yun
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(6): 770.     CrossRef
  • Increased Risk of Hip Fracture in Patients with Acromegaly: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Korea
    Jiwon Kim, Namki Hong, Jimi Choi, Ju Hyung Moon, Eui Hyun Kim, Eun Jig Lee, Sin Gon Kim, Cheol Ryong Ku
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(6): 690.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Therapy: From Discovery to Type 2 Diabetes and Beyond
Adie Viljoen, Stephen C. Bain
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):25-33.   Published online February 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1642
  • 2,680 View
  • 303 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The therapeutic benefits of the incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1), for people with type 2 diabetes and/or obesity, are now firmly established. The evidence-base arising from head-to-head comparative effectiveness studies in people with type 2 diabetes, as well as the recommendations by professional guidelines suggest that GLP1 receptor agonists should replace more traditional treatment options such as sulfonylureas and dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors. Furthermore, their benefits in reducing cardiovascular events in people with type 2 diabetes beyond improvements in glycaemic control has led to numerous clinical trials seeking to translate this benefit beyond type 2 diabetes. Following early trial results their therapeutic benefit is currently being tested in other conditions including fatty liver disease, kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Road towards Triple Agonists: Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide and Glucagon Receptor - An Update
    Agnieszka Jakubowska, Carel W. le Roux, Adie Viljoen
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(1): 12.     CrossRef
  • Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists: cardiovascular benefits and mechanisms of action
    John R. Ussher, Daniel J. Drucker
    Nature Reviews Cardiology.2023; 20(7): 463.     CrossRef
  • A new class of glucose-lowering therapy for type 2 diabetes: the latest development in the incretin arena
    Stephen C Bain, Thinzar Min
    The Lancet.2023; 402(10401): 504.     CrossRef
  • Flattening the biological age curve by improving metabolic health: to taurine or not to taurine, that’ s the question
    Kwok M. Ho, Anna Lee, William Wu, Matthew T.V. Chan, Lowell Ling, Jeffrey Lipman, Jason Roberts, Edward Litton, Gavin M. Joynt, Martin Wong
    Journal of Geriatric Cardiology.2023; 20(11): 813.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Overcoming Therapeutic Inertia as the Achilles’ Heel for Improving Suboptimal Diabetes Care: An Integrative Review
Boon-How Chew, Barakatun-Nisak Mohd-Yusof, Pauline Siew Mei Lai, Kamlesh Khunti
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):34-42.   Published online February 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1649
  • 2,849 View
  • 213 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The ultimate purpose of diabetes care is achieving the outcomes that patients regard as important throughout the life course. Despite advances in pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, psychoeducational programs, information technologies, and digital health, the levels of treatment target achievement in people with diabetes mellitus (DM) have remained suboptimal. This clinical care of people with DM is highly challenging, complex, costly, and confounded for patients, physicians, and healthcare systems. One key underlying problem is clinical inertia in general and therapeutic inertia (TI) in particular. TI refers to healthcare providers’ failure to modify therapy appropriately when treatment goals are not met. TI therefore relates to the prescribing decisions made by healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists. The known causes of TI include factors at the level of the physician (50%), patient (30%), and health system (20%). Although TI is often multifactorial, the literature suggests that 28% of strategies are targeted at multiple levels of causes, 38% at the patient level, 26% at the healthcare professional level, and only 8% at the healthcare system level. The most effective interventions against TI are shorter intervals until revisit appointments and empowering nurses, diabetes educators, and pharmacists to review treatments and modify prescriptions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Obesity management from the perspectives of people living with obesity in Canada: A mixed‐methods study
    David C. W. Lau, Ian Patton, Reena Lavji, Adel Belloum, Ginnie Ng, Renuca Modi
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(4): 1529.     CrossRef
  • Bridging the gap in cardiovascular care in diabetic patients: are cardioprotective antihyperglycemic agents underutilized?
    André J Scheen
    Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology.2023; 16(11): 1053.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Renal Protection of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist, Finerenone, in Diabetic Kidney Disease
Dong-Lim Kim, Seung-Eun Lee, Nan Hee Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):43-55.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1629
  • 5,350 View
  • 750 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). CKD increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases; therefore, its prevention and treatment are important. The prevention of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) can be achieved through intensive glycemic control and blood pressure management. Additionally, DKD treatment aims to reduce albuminuria and improve kidney function. In patients with T2DM, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists can delay the progression of DKD. Hence, there is a need for novel treatments that can effectively suppress DKD progression. Finerenone is a first-in-class nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with clinically proven efficacy in improving albuminuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and risk of cardiovascular events in early and advanced DKD. Therefore, finerenone is a promising treatment option to delay DKD progression. This article reviews the mechanism of renal effects and major clinical outcomes of finerenone in DKD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Neue Antihypertensiva im Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosteron-System
    Markus van der Giet
    CardioVasc.2024; 24(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • Chicoric acid advanced PAQR3 ubiquitination to ameliorate ferroptosis in diabetes nephropathy through the relieving of the interaction between PAQR3 and P110α pathway
    Weiwei Zhang, Yong Liu, Jiajun Zhou, Teng Qiu, Haitang Xie, Zhichen Pu
    Clinical and Experimental Hypertension.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endothelial CXCR2 deficiency attenuates renal inflammation and glycocalyx shedding through NF-κB signaling in diabetic kidney disease
    Siyuan Cui, Xin Chen, Jiayu Li, Wei Wang, Deqi Meng, Shenglong Zhu, Shiwei Shen
    Cell Communication and Signaling.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Targets of Novel Therapeutics for Diabetic Kidney Disease: A New Era of Nephroprotection
    Alessio Mazzieri, Francesca Porcellati, Francesca Timio, Gianpaolo Reboldi
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2024; 25(7): 3969.     CrossRef
  • Epigenetic modification in diabetic kidney disease
    Zhe Liu, Jiahui Liu, Wanning Wang, Xingna An, Ling Luo, Dehai Yu, Weixia Sun
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel Approaches in Chronic Renal Failure without Renal Replacement Therapy: A Review
    Sandra Martínez-Hernández, Martín Muñoz-Ortega, Manuel Ávila-Blanco, Mariana Medina-Pizaño, Javier Ventura-Juárez
    Biomedicines.2023; 11(10): 2828.     CrossRef
  • Finerenone and other future therapeutic options for Alport syndrome
    Helen Pearce, Holly Mabillard
    Journal of Rare Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Calcium & bone metabolism
Cardiovascular Impact of Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements: A Narrative Review
Fatima Zarzour, Ahmad Didi, Mohammed Almohaya, David Kendler
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):56-68.   Published online February 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1644
  • 3,734 View
  • 265 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Calcium and vitamin D play an important role in mineral homeostasis and the maintenance of skeletal health. Calcium and vitamin D supplements have been widely used for fracture prevention in elderly populations. Many trials have studied the effectiveness and cardiovascular safety of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, with disparate results. In this review, we summarize the most important trials and systematic reviews. There is significant heterogeneity in clinical trial design, differences in the nature of trial outcomes (self-reported vs. verified), prior calcium intake, and trial size. Inconsistent results have been reported concerning the effects of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes. Most current guidelines recommend calcium intake of up to 1,200 mg daily, preferably from the diet, without concern for cardiovascular risk. Recommendations regarding vitamin D supplementation vary widely. There is compelling evidence from well-conducted randomized trials that modest vitamin D supplementation is safe but does not confer cardiovascular benefit or cardiovascular harm.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluating adherence, tolerability and safety of oral calcium citrate in elderly osteopenic subjects: a real-life non-interventional, prospective, multicenter study
    Mariangela Rondanelli, Salvatore Minisola, Marco Barale, Daniele Barbaro, Francesca Mansueto, Santina Battaglia, Gloria Bonaccorsi, Santina Caliri, Alessandro Cavioni, Luciano Colangelo, Sabrina Corbetta, Federica Coretti, Giorgia Dito, Valentina Gavioli,
    Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Daily Dietary Calcium Intake and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) in Postmenopausal Korean Women
    Jae Kyung Lee, Thi Minh Chau Tran, Euna Choi, Jinkyung Baek, Hae-Rim Kim, Heeyon Kim, Bo Hyon Yun, Seok Kyo Seo
    Nutrients.2024; 16(7): 1043.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Denosumab on Bone Density in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Comparison with and without Calcium Supplementation in Patients on Standard Diets in Korea
    Chaiho Jeong, Jinyoung Kim, Jeongmin Lee, Yejee Lim, Dong-Jun Lim, Ki-Hyun Baek, Jeonghoon Ha
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(21): 6904.     CrossRef
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Editorials
Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
To Screen or Not to Screen?
Do Joon Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):69-71.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.104
  • 880 View
  • 92 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
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Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
The 2017 United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation for Thyroid Cancer Screening Is No Longer the Gold Standard
Ka Hee Yi
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):72-74.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.106
  • 987 View
  • 79 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
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Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
Thyroid Cancer Screening: How to Maximize Its Benefits and Minimize Its Harms
Jung Hwan Baek
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):75-77.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.105
  • 1,195 View
  • 109 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
PDFPubReader   ePub   

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multidimensional Prediction Method for Thyroid Cancer Based on Spatiotemporally Imbalanced Distribution Data
    Zhiwei Jia, Yuqi Huang, Yanhui Lin, Min Fu, Chenhao Sun
    IEEE Access.2024; 12: 4674.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
All That Glitters Is Not Gold: The Same Sleep Time, but Different Diabetogenic Outcomes
Bohye Kim, Obin Kwon
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):78-80.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.107
  • 1,113 View
  • 77 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
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Original Articles
Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
Survival Comparison of Incidentally Found versus Clinically Detected Thyroid Cancers: An Analysis of a Nationwide Cohort Study
Shinje Moon, Eun Kyung Lee, Hoonsung Choi, Sue K. Park, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):81-92.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1668
  • 1,659 View
  • 151 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The true benefit of thyroid cancer screening is incompletely understood. This study investigated the impact of ultrasound screening on thyroid cancer outcomes through a comparison with symptomatic thyroid cancer using data from a nationwide cohort study in Korea.
Methods
Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and thyroid cancer-specific mortality. Considering the possible bias arising from age, sex, year of thyroid cancer registration, and confounding factors for mortality (including smoking/drinking status, diabetes, and hypertension), all analyses were conducted with stabilized inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) according to the route of detection.
Results
Of 5,796 patients with thyroid cancer, 4,145 were included and 1,651 were excluded due to insufficient data. In comparison with the screening group, the clinical suspicion group was associated with large tumors (17.2±14.6 mm vs. 10.4±7.9 mm), advanced T stage (3–4) (odds ratio [OR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09 to 1.41), extrathyroidal extension (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.32), and advanced stage (III–IV) (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.35). In IPTW-adjusted Cox regression analysis, the clinical suspicion group had significantly higher risks of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.80) and thyroid cancer-specific mortality (HR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.77 to 5.29). Mediation analysis showed that the presence of thyroid-specific symptoms was directly associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality. Thyroid-specific symptoms also indirectly affected thyroid cancer-specific mortality, mediated by tumor size and advanced clinicopathologic status.
Conclusion
Our findings provide important evidence for the survival benefit of early detection of thyroid cancer compared to symptomatic thyroid cancer.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical Characteristics, Diagnostic Approach and Outcome of Thyroid Incidental Findings vs. Clinically Overt Thyroid Nodules: An Observational Single-Centre Study
    Tom Jansen, Nike Stikkelbroeck, Annenienke van de Ven, Ilse van Engen-van Grunsven, Marcel Janssen, Han Bonenkamp, Martin Gotthardt, Romana T. Netea-Maier
    Cancers.2023; 15(8): 2350.     CrossRef
  • Lower Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Patients Detected by Screening: A Meta-Analysis
    Shinje Moon, Young Shin Song, Kyong Yeun Jung, Eun Kyung Lee, Young Joo Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • To Screen or Not to Screen?
    Do Joon Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • The 2017 United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation for Thyroid Cancer Screening Is No Longer the Gold Standard
    Ka Hee Yi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 72.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid Cancer Screening: How to Maximize Its Benefits and Minimize Its Harms
    Jung Hwan Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 75.     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
Lower Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Patients Detected by Screening: A Meta-Analysis
Shinje Moon, Young Shin Song, Kyong Yeun Jung, Eun Kyung Lee, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):93-103.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1667
  • 2,092 View
  • 114 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Thyroid cancer screening has contributed to the skyrocketing prevalence of thyroid cancer. However, the true benefit of thyroid cancer screening is not fully understood. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of screening on the clinical outcomes of thyroid cancer by comparing incidental thyroid cancer (ITC) with non-incidental thyroid cancer (NITC) through a meta-analysis.
Methods
PubMed and Embase were searched from inception to September 2022. We estimated and compared the prevalence of high-risk features (aggressive histology of thyroid cancer, extrathyroidal extension, metastasis to regional lymph nodes or distant organs, and advanced tumor-node-metastasis [TNM] stage), thyroid cancer-specific death, and recurrence in the ITC and NITC groups. We also calculated pooled risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the outcomes derived from these two groups.
Results
From 1,078 studies screened, 14 were included. In comparison to NITC, the ITC group had a lower incidence of aggressive histology (odds ratio [OR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.7), smaller tumors (mean difference, −7.9 mm; 95% CI, −10.2 to −5.6), lymph node metastasis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.86), and distant metastasis (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.77). The risks of recurrence and thyroid cancer-specific mortality were also lower in the ITC group (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.71 and OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.74) than in the NITC group.
Conclusion
Our findings provide important evidence of a survival benefit from the early detection of thyroid cancer compared to symptomatic thyroid cancer.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • To Screen or Not to Screen?
    Do Joon Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • The 2017 United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation for Thyroid Cancer Screening Is No Longer the Gold Standard
    Ka Hee Yi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 72.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid Cancer Screening: How to Maximize Its Benefits and Minimize Its Harms
    Jung Hwan Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 75.     CrossRef
  • Delayed Surgery for and Outcomes of Papillary Thyroid Cancer: Is the Pendulum Still Swinging?
    Giorgio Grani
    Clinical Thyroidology.2023; 35(5): 192.     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
A Comprehensive Assessment of the Harms of Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy for Thyroid Nodules: A Systematic Review
Ji Yong Park, Wonsuk Choi, A Ram Hong, Jee Hee Yoon, Hee Kyung Kim, Ho-Cheol Kang
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):104-116.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1669
  • 3,476 View
  • 157 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
There have concerns related with the potential harms of fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). We aimed to summarize the clinical complications and evaluate the safety of FNAB.
Methods
Studies related with the harms of FNAB were searched on MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane library, and KoreaMed from 2012 to 2022. Also, studies reviewed in the previous systematic reviews were evaluated. Included clinical complications were postprocedural pain, bleeding events, neurological symptoms, tracheal puncture, infections, post-FNAB thyrotoxicosis, and needle tract implantation of thyroid cancers.
Results
Twenty-three cohort studies were included in this review. Nine studies which were related with FNAB-related pain showed that most of the subjects had no or mild discomfort. The 0% to 6.4% of the patients had hematoma or hemorrhage after FNAB, according to 15 studies. Vasovagal reaction, vocal cord palsy, and tracheal puncture have rarely described in the included studies. Needle tract implantation of thyroid malignancies was described in three studies reporting 0.02% to 0.19% of the incidence rate.
Conclusion
FNAB is considered to be a safe diagnostic procedure with rare complications, which are mainly minor events. Thorough assessement of the patients’ medical condition when deciding to perform FNABs would be advisable to lower potential complications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Narrative Review of the 2023 Korean Thyroid Association Management Guideline for Patients with Thyroid Nodules
    Eun Kyung Lee, Young Joo Park, Chan Kwon Jung, Dong Gyu Na
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Fine-needle aspiration cytology for neck lesions in patients with antithrombotic/anticoagulant medications: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Dongbin Ahn, Ji Hye Kwak, Gill Joon Lee, Jin Ho Sohn
    European Radiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • To Screen or Not to Screen?
    Do Joon Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid Cancer Screening: How to Maximize Its Benefits and Minimize Its Harms
    Jung Hwan Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 75.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Appropriateness of Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration
    Lairce Cristina Ribeiro Brito, Iara Beatriz De Carvalho Botêlho, Lanna Matos Silva Fernandes, Nayze Lucena Sangreman Aldeman, Uziel Nunes Silva
    International Journal for Innovation Education and Research.2023; 11(6): 8.     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Thyroid Cancer Screening
Diagnostic Performance of Ultrasound-Based Risk Stratification Systems for Thyroid Nodules: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Leehi Joo, Min Kyoung Lee, Ji Ye Lee, Eun Ju Ha, Dong Gyu Na
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):117-128.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1670
  • 2,146 View
  • 164 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study investigated the diagnostic performance of biopsy criteria in four society ultrasonography risk stratification systems (RSSs) for thyroid nodules, including the 2021 Korean (K)-Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TIRADS).
Methods
The Ovid-MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, and KoreaMed databases were searched and a manual search was conducted to identify original articles investigating the diagnostic performance of biopsy criteria for thyroid nodules (≥1 cm) in four widely used society RSSs.
Results
Eleven articles were included. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 82% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74% to 87%) and 60% (95% CI, 52% to 67%) for the American College of Radiology (ACR)-TIRADS, 89% (95% CI, 85% to 93%) and 34% (95% CI, 26% to 42%) for the American Thyroid Association (ATA) system, 88% (95% CI, 81% to 92%) and 42% (95% CI, 22% to 67%) for the European (EU)-TIRADS, and 96% (95% CI, 94% to 97%) and 21% (95% CI, 17% to 25%) for the 2016 K-TIRADS. The sensitivity and specificity were 76% (95% CI, 74% to 79%) and 50% (95% CI, 49% to 52%) for the 2021 K-TIRADS1.5 (1.5-cm size cut-off for intermediate-suspicion nodules). The pooled unnecessary biopsy rates of the ACR-TIRADS, ATA system, EU-TIRADS, and 2016 K-TIRADS were 41% (95% CI, 32% to 49%), 65% (95% CI, 56% to 74%), 68% (95% CI, 60% to 75%), and 79% (95% CI, 74% to 83%), respectively. The unnecessary biopsy rate was 50% (95% CI, 47% to 53%) for the 2021 K-TIRADS1.5.
Conclusion
The unnecessary biopsy rate of the 2021 K-TIRADS1.5 was substantially lower than that of the 2016 K-TIRADS and comparable to that of the ACR-TIRADS. The 2021 K-TIRADS may help reduce potential harm due to unnecessary biopsies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • To Screen or Not to Screen?
    Do Joon Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • The 2017 United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation for Thyroid Cancer Screening Is No Longer the Gold Standard
    Ka Hee Yi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 72.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid Cancer Screening: How to Maximize Its Benefits and Minimize Its Harms
    Jung Hwan Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 75.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Korean Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Patients with Thyroid Nodules
    Young Joo Park, Eun Kyung Lee, Young Shin Song, Soo Hwan Kang, Bon Seok Koo, Sun Wook Kim, Dong Gyu Na, Seung-Kuk Baek, So Won Oh, Min Kyoung Lee, Sang-Woo Lee, Young Ah Lee, Yong Sang Lee, Ji Ye Lee, Dong-Jun Lim, Leehi Joo, Yuh-Seog Jung, Chan Kwon Jung
    International Journal of Thyroidology.2023; 16(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Appropriateness of Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration
    Lairce Cristina Ribeiro Brito, Iara Beatriz De Carvalho Botêlho, Lanna Matos Silva Fernandes, Nayze Lucena Sangreman Aldeman, Uziel Nunes Silva
    International Journal for Innovation Education and Research.2023; 11(6): 8.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Predicting the Risk of Insulin-Requiring Gestational Diabetes before Pregnancy: A Model Generated from a Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study in Korea
Seung-Hwan Lee, Jin Yu, Kyungdo Han, Seung Woo Lee, Sang Youn You, Hun-Sung Kim, Jae-Hyoung Cho, Kun-Ho Yoon, Mee Kyoung Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):129-138.   Published online January 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1609
  • 2,059 View
  • 152 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The severity of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to generate a risk model for predicting insulin-requiring GDM before pregnancy in Korean women.
Methods
A total of 417,210 women who received a health examination within 52 weeks before pregnancy and delivered between 2011 and 2015 were recruited from the Korean National Health Insurance database. The risk prediction model was created using a sample of 70% of the participants, while the remaining 30% were used for internal validation. Risk scores were assigned based on the hazard ratios for each risk factor in the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. Six risk variables were selected, and a risk nomogram was created to estimate the risk of insulin-requiring GDM.
Results
A total of 2,891 (0.69%) women developed insulin-requiring GDM. Age, body mass index (BMI), current smoking, fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol, and γ-glutamyl transferase were significant risk factors for insulin-requiring GDM and were incorporated into the risk model. Among the variables, old age, high BMI, and high FBG level were the main contributors to an increased risk of insulin-requiring GDM. The concordance index of the risk model for predicting insulin-requiring GDM was 0.783 (95% confidence interval, 0.766 to 0.799). The validation cohort’s incidence rates for insulin-requiring GDM were consistent with the risk model’s predictions.
Conclusion
A novel risk engine was generated to predict insulin-requiring GDM among Korean women. This model may provide helpful information for identifying high-risk women and enhancing prepregnancy care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Establishment and validation of a nomogram to predict the neck contracture after skin grafting in burn patients: A multicentre cohort study
    Rui Li, Yangyang Zheng, Xijuan Fan, Zilong Cao, Qiang Yue, Jincai Fan, Cheng Gan, Hu Jiao, Liqiang Liu
    International Wound Journal.2023; 20(9): 3648.     CrossRef
  • Predicting the Need for Insulin Treatment: A Risk-Based Approach to the Management of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
    Anna S. Koefoed, H. David McIntyre, Kristen S. Gibbons, Charlotte W. Poulsen, Jens Fuglsang, Per G. Ovesen
    Reproductive Medicine.2023; 4(3): 133.     CrossRef
  • Prepregnancy Glucose Levels Within Normal Range and Its Impact on Obstetric Complications in Subsequent Pregnancy: A Population Cohort Study
    Ho Yeon Kim, Ki Hoon Ahn, Geum Joon Cho, Soon-Cheol Hong, Min-Jeong Oh, Hai-Joong Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk of Cause-Specific Mortality across Glucose Spectrum in Elderly People: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Joonyub Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kee-Ho Song, Soon Jib Yoo, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(5): 525.     CrossRef
  • The CHANGED Score—A New Tool for the Prediction of Insulin Dependency in Gestational Diabetes
    Paul Rostin, Selina Balke, Dorota Sroka, Laura Fangmann, Petra Weid, Wolfgang Henrich, Josefine Theresia Königbauer
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(22): 7169.     CrossRef
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Endocrinol Metab : Endocrinology and Metabolism