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Volume 37(3); June 2022
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Review Articles
Thyroid
Euthyroid Thyroperoxidase Antibody Positivity during Pregnancy, to Treat or Not to Treat?
Tim I. M. Korevaar
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):387-391.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.301
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  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb) positivity is a well-known risk factor for thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy and is associated with a suboptimal response to thyroidal stimulation by human chorionic gonadotropin. About 75% of TPOAb positive women are euthyroid and there seems to be a higher risk of predominantly miscarriage and preterm birth in this subgroup. Nonetheless, clinical decision making with regards to gestational levothyroxine treatment remains difficult due to a lack of large randomized trials. Future studies assessing dose-dependent associations and additional biomarkers that can distinguish low-risk from high-risk individuals will be key in disentangling the crude clinical data.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Thyroid autoimmunity and adverse pregnancy outcomes: A multiple center retrospective study
    Yun Xu, Hui Chen, Meng Ren, Yu Gao, Kan Sun, Hongshi Wu, Rui Ding, Junhui Wang, Zheqing Li, Dan Liu, Zilian Wang, Li Yan
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Clinical Implications of Anti-thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies in Graves’ Disease in Basrah
    Emad S Alhubaish, Nassar T Alibrahim, Abbas A Mansour
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Research Progress on the Influence of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease on Pregnancy Outcome
    敏 李
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2023; 13(08): 13720.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Maternal Hypothyroidism during Pregnancy on Minipuberty in Boys
    Karolina Kowalcze, Robert Krysiak, Anna Obuchowicz
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(24): 7649.     CrossRef
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Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Interplay of Vitamin D and CYP3A4 Polymorphisms in Endocrine Disorders and Cancer
Siva Swapna Kasarla, Vannuruswamy Garikapati, Yashwant Kumar, Sujatha Dodoala
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):392-407.   Published online June 3, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1349
  • 4,834 View
  • 190 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Vitamin D has received considerable optimistic attention as a potentially important factor in many pathological states over the past few decades. However, the proportion of the active form of vitamin D metabolites responsible for biological activity is highly questionable in disease states due to flexible alterations in the enzymes responsible for their metabolism. For instance, CYP3A4 plays a crucial role in the biotransformation of vitamin D and other drug substances. Food-drug and/or drug-drug interactions, the disease state, genetic polymorphism, age, sex, diet, and environmental factors all influence CYP3A4 activity. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP450-encoding genes have received considerable attention in the past few decades due to their extensive impact on the pharmacokinetic and dynamic properties of drugs and endogenous substances. In this review, we focused on CYP3A4 polymorphisms and their interplay with vitamin D metabolism and summarized the role of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis, bone diseases, diabetes, cancer, other diseases, and drug substances. We also reviewed clinical observations pertaining to CYP3A4 polymorphisms among the aforementioned disease conditions. In addition, we highlighted the future perspectives of studying the pharmacogenetics of CYP3A4, which may have potential clinical significance for developing novel diagnostic genetic markers that will ascertain disease risk and progression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Heat stress as a potential risk factor for vitamin D deficiency
    Martina Balducci, Letizia Pruccoli, Andrea Tarozzi
    Medical Hypotheses.2023; 176: 111085.     CrossRef
  • Association and Haplotype Analysis of the PON1, ITGB3 and CYP3A4 Genes, Strong Candidates for Familial Coronary Artery Disease Susceptibility
    Faruk SAYDAM, İrfan DEĞİRMENCİ, Alparslan BİRDANE, Cansu ÖZBAYER, Taner ULUS, Mahmut ÖZDEMİR, Necmi ATA, Hasan Veysi GÜNEŞ
    Online Türk Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2023; 8(1): 81.     CrossRef
  • Association of flame retardants, polybrominated diethyl ethers (PBDEs), with vitamin D in female subjects
    Alexandra E. Butler, Edwina Brennan, Daniel S. Drage, Thozhukat Sathyapalan, Stephen L. Atkin
    Chemosphere.2023; 338: 139488.     CrossRef
  • Genetic variations of CYP3A4 on the metabolism of itraconazole in vitro
    Sai-li Xie, Xiayan Zhu, Nanyong Gao, Qianmeng Lin, Chaojie Chen, Yun-jun Yang, Jian-ping Cai, Guo-xin Hu, Ren-ai Xu
    Food and Chemical Toxicology.2023; 181: 114101.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Human Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle: A Tool for Metabolic Research
Ji-Hoon Kim, Seung-Min Yu, Jang Won Son
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):408-414.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.302
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Skeletal muscle is now regarded as an endocrine organ based on its secretion of myokines and exerkines, which, in response to metabolic stimuli, regulate the crosstalk between the skeletal muscle and other metabolic organs in terms of systemic energy homeostasis. This conceptual basis of skeletal muscle as a metabolically active organ has provided insights into the potential role of physical inactivity and conditions altering muscle quality and quantity in the development of multiple metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. Therefore, it is important to understand human muscle physiology more deeply in relation to the pathophysiology of metabolic diseases. Since monolayer cell lines or animal models used in conventional research differ from the pathophysiological features of the human body, there is increasing need for more physiologically relevant in vitro models of human skeletal muscle. Here, we introduce recent studies on in vitro models of human skeletal muscle generated from adult myogenic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells and summarize recent progress in the development of three-dimensional (3D) bioartificial muscle, which mimics the physiological complexity of native skeletal muscle tissue in terms of maturation and functionality. We then discuss the future of skeletal muscle 3D-organoid culture technology in the field of metabolic research for studying pathological mechanisms and developing personalized therapeutic strategies.
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Extra-Glycemic Effects of Anti-Diabetic Medications: Two Birds with One Stone?
Eun-Jung Rhee
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):415-429.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.304
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  • 248 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The world is suffering from a rapid increase in the number of people with diabetes due to the increased prevalence of obesity and lengthened life span. Since the development of insulin thanks to the efforts of Prof. Banting and Dr. Best in 1922, for which they won the Nobel Prize, remarkable developments in anti-diabetic medications have dramatically lengthened the lifespan of patients with diabetes. However, the control rate of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes remains unsatisfactory, since glycemic control requires both medication and lifestyle modifications to slow the deterioration of pancreatic beta-cell function and prevent diabetic complications. From the initial “triumvirate” to the “ominous octet,” and now the “egregious eleven,” the number of organs recognized as being involved in hyperglycemia and diabetes has increased with the development of anti-diabetic medications. Recent unexpected results from outcome trials of anti-diabetic medications have enabled anti-diabetic medications to be indicated for the prevention of chronic kidney disease and heart failure, even in patients without diabetes. In this review, I would like to summarize the extra-glycemic effects of anti-diabetic medications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between underweight and risk of heart failure in diabetes patients
    Tae Kyung Yoo, Kyung‐Do Han, Eun‐Jung Rhee, Won‐Young Lee
    Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Glucagon-Like Peptide Receptor Agonist Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Proliferation and Migration in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Ameliorates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Calcification
    Jinmi Lee, Seok-Woo Hong, Min-Jeong Kim, Sun Joon Moon, Hyemi Kwon, Se Eun Park, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • To do one and to get more: Part I. Diabetes and bone
    Wen-Ling Lee, Peng-Hui Wang, Szu-Ting Yang, Chia-Hao Liu, Wen-Hsun Chang, Fa-Kung Lee
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association.2022; 85(10): 965.     CrossRef
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Editorial
Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Sclerostin as a Putative Myokine in Sarcopenia
Hyon-Seung Yi
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):430-431.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.303
  • 1,716 View
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  • Organokines, Sarcopenia, and Metabolic Repercussions: The Vicious Cycle and the Interplay with Exercise
    Giulia Minniti, Letícia Maria Pescinini-Salzedas, Guilherme Almeida dos Santos Minniti, Lucas Fornari Laurindo, Sandra Maria Barbalho, Renata Vargas Sinatora, Lance Alan Sloan, Rafael Santos de Argollo Haber, Adriano Cressoni Araújo, Karina Quesada, Jesse
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(21): 13452.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Short-Chain Fatty Acids Attenuate Renal Fibrosis and Enhance Autophagy of Renal Tubular Cells in Diabetic Mice Through the HDAC2/ULK1 Axis
Xiaoying Ma, Qiong Wang
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):432-443.   Published online May 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1336
  • 6,604 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study investigated the effect of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on diabetes in a mouse model.
Methods
Autophagy in Akita mice and streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice was determined by Western blots and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Western blots, IHC, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson staining, periodic acid-Schiff staining, and picrosirius red staining were conducted to detect whether autophagy and renal function improved in Akita mice and STZ-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice after treatment of SCFAs. Western blots, IHC, and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed to determine whether SCFAs affected diabetic mice via the histone deacetylase (HDAC2)/unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) axis. Diabetic mice with kidney-specific knockout of HDAC2 were constructed, and IHC, Masson staining, and Western blots were carried out to detect whether the deletion of endogenous HDAC2 contributed to the improvement of autophagy and renal fibrosis in diabetic mice.
Results
Reduced autophagy and severe fibrosis were observed in Akita mice and STZ-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Increased autophagy and reduced renal cell fibrosis were found in SCFA-treated Akita diabetic mice and STZ-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Diabetic mice treated with SCFAs had lower HDAC2 expression and more enriched binding of ULK1 promoter sequences to H3K27Ac. Endogenous knockout of HDAC2 caused enhanced autophagy and decreased renal fibrosis in diabetic mice treated with SCFAs.
Conclusion
SCFAs enhanced autophagy of renal tubular cells and attenuated renal fibrosis in diabetic mice through the HDAC2/ULK1 axis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Epigenetic and post-translational modifications in autophagy: biological functions and therapeutic targets
    Feng Shu, Han Xiao, Qiu-Nuo Li, Xiao-Shuai Ren, Zhi-Gang Liu, Bo-Wen Hu, Hong-Sheng Wang, Hao Wang, Guan-Min Jiang
    Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms of Blood–Brain Barrier Protection by Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids
    Ekaterina Fock, Rimma Parnova
    Cells.2023; 12(4): 657.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Histone Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Kidney Disease
    Christodoula Kourtidou, Konstantinos Tziomalos
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(6): 6007.     CrossRef
  • Mechanism of histone deacetylase HDAC2 in FOXO3-mediated trophoblast pyroptosis in preeclampsia
    Jia Liu, Weihui Yang
    Functional & Integrative Genomics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Macrophage polarization induces endothelium-to-myofibroblast transition in chronic allograft dysfunction
    Zeping Gui, Xiang Zhang, Qianguang Han, Zhou Hang, Ruoyun Tan, Min Gu, Zijie Wang
    Renal Failure.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Periodic acid–Schiff staining in oral exfoliative cytology of diabetic patients: The odyssey for noninvasive screening – A systematic review and meta-analysis
    KYesoda Aniyan, KrithikaChandrasekar Lakshmi, Anuradha Ganesan
    Dental Research Journal.2023; 20(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Luteolin alleviates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats by inhibiting metalloenzymes expression
    Rakesh B. Daude, Jigna S. Shah
    Current Issues in Pharmacy and Medical Sciences.2023; 36(4): 199.     CrossRef
  • Molecular mechanisms of histone deacetylases and inhibitors in renal fibrosis progression
    Jiayu Wang, Jiaxing Li, Xin Zhang, Min Zhang, Xiaopeng Hu, Hang Yin
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sacubitril/Valsartan contributes to improving the diabetic kidney disease and regulating the gut microbiota in mice
    Peipei Wang, Ruixue Guo, Xiwen Bai, Wen Cui, Yiding Zhang, Huangmin Li, Jin Shang, Zhanzheng Zhao
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Recent advances and potentiality of postbiotics in the food industry: Composition, inactivation methods, current applications in metabolic syndrome, and future trends
    Yujie Zhong, Tao Wang, Ruilin Luo, Jiayu Liu, Ruyi Jin, Xiaoli Peng
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Effect of the Concomitant Use of Subcutaneous Basal Insulin and Intravenous Insulin Infusion in the Treatment of Severe Hyperglycemic Patients
Yejee Lim, Jung Hun Ohn, Joo Jeong, Jiwon Ryu, Sun-wook Kim, Jae Ho Cho, Hee-Sun Park, Hye Won Kim, Jongchan Lee, Eun Sun Kim, Nak-Hyun Kim, You Hwan Jo, Hak Chul Jang
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):444-454.   Published online June 3, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1341
  • 3,818 View
  • 229 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
No consensus exists regarding the early use of subcutaneous (SC) basal insulin facilitating the transition from continuous intravenous insulin infusion (CIII) to multiple SC insulin injections in patients with severe hyperglycemia other than diabetic ketoacidosis. This study evaluated the effect of early co-administration of SC basal insulin with CIII on glucose control in patients with severe hyperglycemia.
Methods
Patients who received CIII for the management of severe hyperglycemia were divided into two groups: the early basal insulin group (n=86) if they received the first SC basal insulin 0.25 U/kg body weight within 24 hours of CIII initiation and ≥4 hours before discontinuation, and the delayed basal insulin group (n=79) if they were not classified as the early basal insulin group. Rebound hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose level of >250 mg/dL in 24 hours following CIII discontinuation. Propensity score matching (PSM) methods were additionally employed for adjusting the confounding factors (n=108).
Results
The rebound hyperglycemia incidence was significantly lower in the early basal insulin group than in the delayed basal insulin group (54.7% vs. 86.1%), despite using PSM methods (51.9%, 85.2%). The length of hospital stay was shorter in the early basal insulin group than in the delayed basal insulin group (8.5 days vs. 9.6 days, P=0.027). The hypoglycemia incidence did not differ between the groups.
Conclusion
Early co-administration of basal insulin with CIII prevents rebound hyperglycemia and shorten hospital stay without increasing the hypoglycemic events in patients with severe hyperglycemia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • 16. Diabetes Care in the Hospital: Standards of Care in Diabetes—2024
    Nuha A. ElSayed, Grazia Aleppo, Raveendhara R. Bannuru, Dennis Bruemmer, Billy S. Collins, Laya Ekhlaspour, Rodolfo J. Galindo, Marisa E. Hilliard, Eric L. Johnson, Kamlesh Khunti, Ildiko Lingvay, Glenn Matfin, Rozalina G. McCoy, Mary Lou Perry, Scott J.
    Diabetes Care.2024; 47(Supplement): S295.     CrossRef
  • 16. Diabetes Care in the Hospital: Standards of Care in Diabetes—2023
    Nuha A. ElSayed, Grazia Aleppo, Vanita R. Aroda, Raveendhara R. Bannuru, Florence M. Brown, Dennis Bruemmer, Billy S. Collins, Marisa E. Hilliard, Diana Isaacs, Eric L. Johnson, Scott Kahan, Kamlesh Khunti, Jose Leon, Sarah K. Lyons, Mary Lou Perry, Priya
    Diabetes Care.2023; 46(Supplement): S267.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of early insulin glargine administration in combination with continuous intravenous insulin infusion in the management of diabetic ketoacidosis: A randomized controlled trial
    Kitti Thammakosol, Chutintorn Sriphrapradang
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2023; 25(3): 815.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
The Impact of Insulin Resistance on Hepatic Fibrosis among United States Adults with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: NHANES 2017 to 2018
Ji Cheol Bae, Lauren A. Beste, Kristina M. Utzschneider
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):455-465.   Published online June 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1434
  • 3,891 View
  • 131 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We aimed to investigate the association of hepatic steatosis with liver fibrosis and to assess the interactive effects of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance on liver fibrosis in a nationally representative sample of United States adults.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2017 to 2018, which for the first time included transient elastography to assess liver stiffness and hepatic steatosis. We evaluated the association between hepatic steatosis (using controlled attenuation parameter [CAP]) and clinically significant liver fibrosis (defined as liver stiffness ≥7.5 kPa) using logistic regression with an interaction term for hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance (defined as homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance ≥3.0).
Results
Among adults undergoing transient elastography (n=2,023), 45.9% had moderate or greater hepatic steatosis and 11.3% had clinically significant liver fibrosis. After adjustment for demographic and metabolic factors, the odds of significant liver fibrosis increased as CAP score rose (odds ratio, 1.35 per standard deviation increment; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.64). We detected a significant interaction effect between CAP score and insulin resistance on the probability of significant liver fibrosis (P=0.016 for interaction). The probability of significant liver fibrosis increased in the presence of insulin resistance with increasing CAP score, while those without insulin resistance had low probability of significant liver fibrosis, even with high CAP scores.
Conclusion
Individuals with hepatic steatosis had higher odds of fibrosis when insulin resistance was present. Our findings emphasize the importance of the metabolic aspects of the disease on fibrosis risk and suggest a need to better identify patients with metabolic associated fatty liver disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of insulin resistance indicators with hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in patients with metabolic syndrome
    Tzu-chia Kuo, Yang-bor Lu, Chieh-lun Yang, Bin Wang, Lin-xin Chen, Ching-ping Su
    BMC Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • No More NAFLD: The Term Is Now MASLD
    Ji Cheol Bae
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(1): 92.     CrossRef
  • Greater Severity of Steatosis Is Associated with a Higher Risk of Incident Diabetes: A Retrospective Longitudinal Study
    Ji Min Han, Jung Hwan Cho, Hye In Kim, Sunghwan Suh, Yu-Ji Lee, Jung Won Lee, Kwang Min Kim, Ji Cheol Bae
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(4): 418.     CrossRef
  • Hepatic T-cell senescence and exhaustion are implicated in the progression of fatty liver disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and mouse model with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
    Byeong Chang Sim, Yea Eun Kang, Sun Kyoung You, Seong Eun Lee, Ha Thi Nga, Ho Yeop Lee, Thi Linh Nguyen, Ji Sun Moon, Jingwen Tian, Hyo Ju Jang, Jeong Eun Lee, Hyon-Seung Yi
    Cell Death & Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Familial clustering of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in first‐degree relatives of adults with lean nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
    Sorachat Niltwat, Chanin Limwongse, Natthinee Charatcharoenwitthaya, Duangkamon Bunditvorapoom, Wimolrak Bandidniyamanon, Phunchai Charatcharoenwitthaya
    Liver International.2023; 43(12): 2713.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic Score for Insulin Resistance Is Inversely Related to Incident Advanced Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Jun-Hyuk Lee, Yu-Jin Kwon, Kyongmin Park, Hye Sun Lee, Hoon-Ki Park, Jee Hye Han, Sang Bong Ahn
    Nutrients.2022; 14(15): 3039.     CrossRef
  • DPP-4 Inhibitor in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patient with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Achieving Two Goals at Once?
    Ji Cheol Bae
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(6): 858.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Improvement in Age at Mortality and Changes in Causes of Death in the Population with Diabetes: An Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
Eugene Han, Sun Ok Song, Hye Soon Kim, Kang Ju Son, Sun Ha Jee, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):466-474.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1440
  • 3,657 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Diabetes is a leading cause of death that is responsible for 1.6 million annual deaths worldwide. However, the life expectancy and age at death of people with diabetes have been a matter of debate.
Methods
The National Health Insurance Service claims database, merged with death records from the National Statistical Information Service in Korea from 2006 to 2018, was analyzed.
Results
In total, 1,432,567 deaths were collected. The overall age at death increased by 0.44 and 0.26 year/year in the diabetes and control populations, respectively. The disparity in the mean age at death between the diabetes and control populations narrowed from 5.2 years in 2006 to 3.0 years in 2018 (p<0.001). In a subgroup analysis according to the presence of comorbid diseases, the number and proportion of deaths remained steady in the group with diabetes only, but steadily increased in the groups with diabetes combined with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension. Compared to the control population, the increase in the mean death age was higher in the population with diabetes. This trend was more prominent in the groups with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension than in the diabetes only group. Deaths from vascular disease and diabetes decreased, whereas deaths from cancer and pneumonia increased. The decline in the proportion of deaths from vascular disease was greater in the diabetes groups with hypertension and/or dyslipidemia than in the control population.
Conclusion
The age at death in the population with diabetes increased more steeply and reached a comparable level to those without diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Cause-of-Death Mortality in Children and Young Adults with Diabetes: A Nationwide 10-Year Follow-Up Cohort Study
    Iee-Ho Choi, Sang-Woo Yeom, Sun-Young Kim, Jihye You, Jong-Seung Kim, Minsun Kim
    Children.2023; 10(2): 358.     CrossRef
  • Age at Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Underwent Kidney Transplantation: An Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
    Sun Ok Song, Eugene Han, Kang Ju Son, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(9): 3160.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Cause-Specific Mortality across Glucose Spectrum in Elderly People: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Joonyub Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kee-Ho Song, Soon Jib Yoo, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(5): 525.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Cumulative Exposure to High γ-Glutamyl Transferase Levels and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Han-Sang Baek, Bongseong Kim, Seung-Hwan Lee, Dong-Jun Lim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Sang-Ah Chang, Kyungdo Han, Jae-Seung Yun
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(6): 770.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Association between the Blautia/Bacteroides Ratio and Altered Body Mass Index after Bariatric Surgery
Yoonhong Kim, Dooheon Son, Bu Kyung Kim, Ki Hyun Kim, Kyung Won Seo, Kyoungwon Jung, Seun Ja Park, Sanghyun Lim, Jae Hyun Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):475-486.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1481
Correction in: Endocrinol Metab 2022;37(4):701
  • 2,851 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Current evidence support that the gut microbiota plays a potential role in obesity. Bariatric surgery can reduce excess weight and decrease the risk of life-threatening weight-related health problems and may also influence gut microbiota. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes in gut microbiota before and after bariatric surgery and evaluate the association of the gut microbial shift and altered body mass index (BMI) after bariatric surgery.
Methods
Between January 2019 and July 2020, stools from 58 patients scheduled for bariatric surgery were collected. Six months after bariatric surgery, stools from 22 of these patients were re-collected, and the changes in gut microbiota before and after bariatric surgery were evaluated. In addition, the differences in gut microbiota between patients with severe obesity (BMI >35 kg/m2, n=42) and healthy volunteers with normal BMI (18.8 to 22.8 kg/m2, n=41) were investigated.
Results
The gut microbiota of patients who underwent bariatric surgery showed increased α-diversity and differed β-diversity compared with those before surgery. Interestingly, Blautia was decreased and Bacteriodes was increased at the genus level after bariatric surgery. Further, the Blautia/Bacteroides ratio showed a positive correlation with BMI. To validate these results, we compared the gut microbiota from severely obese patients with high BMI with those from healthy volunteers and demonstrated that the Blautia/Bacteroides ratio correlated positively with BMI.
Conclusion
In the gut microbial analysis of patients who underwent bariatric surgery, we presented that the Blautia/Bacteroides ratio had changed after bariatric surgery and showed a positive correlation with BMI.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Modulation of the gut microbiome and Firmicutes phylum reduction by a nutraceutical blend in the obesity mouse model and overweight humans: A double‐blind clinical trial
    Victor Nehmi‐Filho, Jessica Alves de Freitas, Lucas Augusto Franco, Roberta Cristina Martins, José Antônio Orellana Turri, Aline Boveto Santamarina, Joyce Vanessa da Silva Fonseca, Ester Cerdeira Sabino, Bruna Carvalho Moraes, Erica Souza, Gilson Masahiro
    Food Science & Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Natural emulsifiers lecithins preserve gut microbiota diversity in relation with specific faecal lipids in high fat-fed mice
    Chloé Robert, Armelle Penhoat, Leslie Couëdelo, Magali Monnoye, Dominique Rainteau, Emmanuelle Meugnier, Sofia Bary, Hélène Abrous, Emmanuelle Loizon, Pranvera Krasniqi, Stéphanie Chanon, Aurélie Vieille-Marchiset, François Caillet, Sabine Danthine, Huber
    Journal of Functional Foods.2023; 105: 105540.     CrossRef
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    Zhang Yanan, Ma Lu, Zhang Lu, Huo Jinhai, Wang Weiming
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • First characterization of the intestinal microbiota in healthy Tunisian adults using 16S rRNA gene sequencing
    Ahlem Mahjoub Khachroub, Magali Monnoye, Nour Elhouda Bouhlel, Sana Azaiez, Maha Ben Fredj, Wejdene Mansour, Philippe Gérard
    FEMS Microbiology Letters.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gut microbiota and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
    Boyeon Kim, Bukyung Kim
    Kosin Medical Journal.2023; 38(3): 169.     CrossRef
  • Obésité et risque cardiovasculaire : le rôle de la chirurgie bariatrique dans la modulation du microbiote intestinal
    Davide Masi, Mickael Massicard, Karine Clément
    Nutrition Clinique et Métabolisme.2023; 37(2): 2S8.     CrossRef
  • The Related Metabolic Diseases and Treatments of Obesity
    Ming Yang, Shuai Liu, Chunye Zhang
    Healthcare.2022; 10(9): 1616.     CrossRef
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Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Decreased Serum Level of Sclerostin in Older Adults with Sarcopenia
Seong Hee Ahn, Hee-Won Jung, Eunju Lee, Ji Yeon Baek, Il-Young Jang, So Jeong Park, Jin Young Lee, Eunah Choi, Yun Sun Lee, Seongbin Hong, Beom-Jun Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):487-496.   Published online May 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1428
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  • 137 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Although muscles and bones interact with each other through various secretory factors, the role of sclerostin, an osteocyte-secreted factor, on muscle metabolism has not been well studied. We investigated the levels of serum sclerostin in Korean older adults with sarcopenia.
Methods
Blood samples were collected from 129 participants who underwent evaluation of muscle mass and function in an outpatient geriatric clinic of a teaching hospital. Sarcopenia and related parameters were determined using cutoff values for the Asian population. Serum sclerostin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Results
The mean age of the participants was 69.6 years, and 20 participants (15.5%) were classified as having sarcopenia. After adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index, serum sclerostin levels were significantly lower in participants with sarcopenia, low muscle mass, or weak muscle strength (P=0.003 to 0.045). Serum sclerostin levels were positively associated with skeletal muscle index and grip strength after adjusting for confounders (P=0.001 and P=0.003), whereas sarcopenic phenotype score showed a negative association (P=0.006). These increases in muscle mass and strength were also dose dependent as serum sclerostin levels increased (P for trends=0.003 and P for trends=0.015). Higher serum sclerostin levels were associated with lower odds ratio (ORs) for sarcopenia, low muscle mass, and weak muscle strength after adjusting for confounders (OR, 0.27 to 0.50; P<0.001 to 0.025).
Conclusion
Higher serum sclerostin levels were associated with a lower risk of sarcopenia, low muscle mass, and weak muscle strength in Korean older adults.

Citations

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  • Mechanism and physical activities in bone-skeletal muscle crosstalk
    Zhonghan Zhao, Kai Yan, Qiao Guan, Qiang Guo, Can Zhao
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of bone mass in older adults with normal- and overweight derived from the crosstalk with muscle and adipose tissue
    Carina O. Walowski, Catrin Herpich, Janna Enderle, Wiebke Braun, Marcus Both, Mario Hasler, Manfred J. Müller, Kristina Norman, Anja Bosy-Westphal
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of the Osteocyte in Musculoskeletal Disease
    Anika Shimonty, Lynda F. Bonewald, Fabrizio Pin
    Current Osteoporosis Reports.2023; 21(3): 303.     CrossRef
  • The role of sclerostin in lipid and glucose metabolism disorders
    Hewen Jiang, Dijie Li, Ying Han, Nanxi Li, Xiaohui Tao, Jin Liu, Zongkang Zhang, Yuanyuan Yu, Luyao Wang, Sifan Yu, Ning Zhang, Huan Xiao, Xin Yang, Yihao Zhang, Ge Zhang, Bao-Ting Zhang
    Biochemical Pharmacology.2023; 215: 115694.     CrossRef
  • Cytokines and exosomal miRNAs in skeletal muscle–adipose crosstalk
    Liu Guo, Menchus Quan, Weijun Pang, Yulong Yin, Fengna Li
    Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 34(10): 666.     CrossRef
  • Sclerostin: clinical insights in muscle–bone crosstalk
    Antimo Moretti, Giovanni Iolascon
    Journal of International Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anti-sclerostin antibodies: a new frontier in fragility fractures treatment
    Giovanni Iolascon, Sara Liguori, Marco Paoletta, Giuseppe Toro, Antimo Moretti
    Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sclerostin as a Putative Myokine in Sarcopenia
    Hyon-Seung Yi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(3): 430.     CrossRef
  • Organokines, Sarcopenia, and Metabolic Repercussions: The Vicious Cycle and the Interplay with Exercise
    Giulia Minniti, Letícia Maria Pescinini-Salzedas, Guilherme Almeida dos Santos Minniti, Lucas Fornari Laurindo, Sandra Maria Barbalho, Renata Vargas Sinatora, Lance Alan Sloan, Rafael Santos de Argollo Haber, Adriano Cressoni Araújo, Karina Quesada, Jesse
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(21): 13452.     CrossRef
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Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Real-World Safety and Effectiveness of Denosumab in Patients with Osteoporosis: A Prospective, Observational Study in South Korea
Yumie Rhee, Dong-Gune Chang, Jeonghoon Ha, Sooa Kim, Yusun Lee, Euna Jo, Jung-Min Koh
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):497-505.   Published online June 3, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1427
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  • 256 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The efficacy and safety of denosumab have been established in a phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Korean postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. This postmarketing surveillance study was aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of denosumab in Korean real-world clinical practice.
Methods
Patients with osteoporosis who had received denosumab per the Korean approved indications in the postmarketing setting between September 2014 and September 2019 were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the incidence of adverse events (AEs) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The secondary endpoint was the percent change from baseline in bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck.
Results
Of the 3,221 patients enrolled, 3,185 were included in the safety analysis set; 2,973 (93.3%) were female, and the mean± standard deviation (SD) age was 68.9±9.9 years. The mean±SD study period was 350.0±71.4 days. AEs, fatal AEs, and ADRs occurred in 19.3%, 0.8%, and 1.6%, respectively. The most frequent AEs, occurring in >0.5% of patients, were dizziness (0.7%), arthralgia (0.7%), back pain (0.6%), and myalgia (0.6%). Hypocalcemia occurred in 0.3% of patients. There were no cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fracture. Mean±SD percent change from baseline in BMD of the lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck was 7.3%±23.6%, 3.6%±31.4%, and 3.2%±10.7%, respectively.
Conclusion
The safety and effectiveness of denosumab in Korean patients with osteoporosis in this study were comparable with those in the Korean randomized controlled trial, with no new safety findings.

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  • Prevalence of denosumab-induced hypocalcemia: a retrospective observational study of patients routinely monitored with ionized calcium post-injection
    Anna Spångeus, Johan Rydetun, Mischa Woisetschläger
    Osteoporosis International.2024; 35(1): 173.     CrossRef
  • Cost-consequence analysis of continuous denosumab therapy for osteoporosis treatment in South Korea
    Seungju Cha, Minjeong Sohn, Hyowon Yang, Eric J. Yeh, Ki-Hyun Baek, Jeonghoon Ha, Hyemin Ku
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adverse Effects of Denosumab in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A 20-Year Retrospective Single-Center Observation Study in Central Taiwan
    Tsung-Yin Tsai, Zi-Hong You, Shang-Feng Tsai, Ming-Ju Wu, Tung-Min Yu, Ya-Wen Chuang, Yung-Chieh Lin, Ya-Lian Deng, Chiann-Yi Hsu, Cheng-Hsu Chen
    Transplantation Proceedings.2023; 55(4): 837.     CrossRef
  • Persistence with Denosumab in Male Osteoporosis Patients: A Real-World, Non-Interventional Multicenter Study
    Chaiho Jeong, Jeongmin Lee, Jinyoung Kim, Jeonghoon Ha, Kwanhoon Jo, Yejee Lim, Mee Kyoung Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Tae-Seo Sohn, Ki-Ho Song, Moo Il Kang, Ki-Hyun Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(2): 260.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Denosumab on Bone Density in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Comparison with and without Calcium Supplementation in Patients on Standard Diets in Korea
    Chaiho Jeong, Jinyoung Kim, Jeongmin Lee, Yejee Lim, Dong-Jun Lim, Ki-Hyun Baek, Jeonghoon Ha
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(21): 6904.     CrossRef
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    Reactions Weekly.2022; 1919(1): 221.     CrossRef
  • Denosumab, an effective osteoporosis treatment option for men
    Sung Hye Kong
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2022; 37(5): 947.     CrossRef
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Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Bone Mineral Density Screening Interval and Transition to Osteoporosis in Asian Women
Hyunju Park, Heera Yang, Jung Heo, Hye Won Jang, Jae Hoon Chung, Tae Hyuk Kim, Yong-Ki Min, Sun Wook Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):506-512.   Published online June 9, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1429
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Bone mineral density (BMD) testing is indicated for women aged 65 years, but screening strategies for osteoporosis are controversial. Currently, there is no study focusing on the BMD testing interval in Asian populations. The current study aimed to evaluate the estimated time interval for screening osteoporosis.
Methods
We conducted a study of 6,385 subjects aged 50 years and older who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry screening more than twice at Samsung Medical Center as participants in a routine health checkup. Subjects were divided based on baseline T-score into mild osteopenia (T-score, <–1.0 to >–1.5), moderate osteopenia (T-score, ≤–1.5 to >–2.0), and severe osteopenia (T-score, ≤–2.0 to >–2.5). Information about personal medical and social history was collected by a structured questionnaire.
Results
The adjusted estimated BMD testing interval for 10% of the subjects to develop osteoporosis was 13.2 years in mild osteopenia, 5.0 years in moderate osteopenia, and 1.5 years in severe osteopenia.
Conclusion
Our study provides extended information about BMD screening intervals in Asian female population. Baseline T-score was important for predicting BMD screening interval, and repeat BMD testing within 5 years might not be necessary in mild osteopenia subjects.

Citations

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  • Effects of Bazedoxifene/Vitamin D Combination Therapy on Serum Vitamin D Levels and Bone Turnover Markers in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Chaiho Jeong, Jeonghoon Ha, Jun-Il Yoo, Young-Kyun Lee, Jung Hee Kim, Yong-Chan Ha, Yong-Ki Min, Dong-Won Byun, Ki-Hyun Baek, Ho Yeon Chung
    Journal of Bone Metabolism.2023; 30(2): 189.     CrossRef
  • Bone-modifying agents for non–small-cell lung cancer patients with bone metastases during the era of immune checkpoint inhibitors: A narrative review
    Jinyoung Kim, Chaiho Jeong, Jeongmin Lee, Jeonghoon Ha, Ki-Hyun Baek, Seohyun Kim, Tai Joon An, Chan Kwon Park, Hyoung Kyu Yoon, Jeong Uk Lim
    Seminars in Oncology.2023; 50(3-5): 105.     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Seaweed and Iodine Intakes and SLC5A5 rs77277498 in Relation to Thyroid Cancer
Tung Hoang, Eun Kyung Lee, Jeonghee Lee, Yul Hwangbo, Jeongseon Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):513-523.   Published online May 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1306
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study aims to elucidate the associations among dietary seaweed (gim and miyeok/dashima) and iodine intakes, the rs77277498 polymorphism of the SLC5A5 gene codifying the sodium/iodine symporter, and thyroid cancer risk in a Korean population.
Methods
We conducted a case-control study of 117 thyroid cancer cases and 173 controls who participated in the Cancer Screenee Cohort between 2002 and 2014 at the National Cancer Center, Korea. The amount of seaweed and iodine consumption (g/day) was estimated using the residual energy adjustment method. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a multivariable logistic regression model for the separate and combined effect of dietary iodine-based intake and SLC5A5 polymorphism (rs77277498, C>G) on thyroid cancer.
Results
Dietary gim and iodine intakes were inversely associated with thyroid cancer, with ORs of 0.50 (95% CI, 0.30 to 0.83) and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.35 to 0.95), respectively, whereas the associations for dietary miyeok/dashima and total seaweed intakes were not significant. However, compared with individuals carrying the C/C genotype of the rs77277498 polymorphism with a low intake of all dietary factors, those carrying the G allele with a high intake had a lower risk of thyroid cancer, with ORs of 0.25 (95% CI, 0.10 to 0.56), 0.31 (95% CI, 0.12 to 0.77), 0.26 (95% CI, 0.10 to 0.62), and 0.30 (95% CI, 0.12 to 0.73) for the consumption of gim, miyeok/dashima, total seaweed, and iodine, respectively.
Conclusion
In summary, our results supported the evidence of the protective effects of dietary gim and iodine intake against thyroid cancer risk, and this association can be strengthened by SLC5A5 rs77277498 genotypes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Iodine nutrition and papillary thyroid cancer
    Xueqi Zhang, Fan Zhang, Qiuxian Li, Chuyao Feng, Weiping Teng
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Clinical Outcomes of Repeated Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Graves’ Disease
Min Joo Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Ye An Kim, Hoon Sung Choi, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park, Bo Youn Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):524-532.   Published online June 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1418
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  • 215 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy is a successful therapeutic modality for Graves’ disease. However, RAI therapy can fail, and RAI therapy after antithyroid drugs (ATDs) has a lower remission rate. Therefore, many patients require repeated RAI therapy. This study investigated the clinical outcomes of repeated RAI therapy for Graves’ disease.
Methods
Patients who underwent RAI therapy as second-line therapy after failure of ATD treatment between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed. Remission was defined as hypothyroid or euthyroid status without ATD, and with or without levothyroxine at 12 months after RAI therapy.
Results
The 1-year remission rate after 2nd RAI therapy (66%, 152/230) is significantly higher than that after 1st RAI therapy (48%, 393/815) or long-term ATD treatment after 1st RAI therapy failure (42%). The clinical response to 2nd RAI therapy was more rapid. The median time intervals from the 2nd RAI therapy to ATD discontinuation (1.3 months) and to the start of levothyroxine replacement (2.5 months) were significantly shorter than those for the 1st RAI therapy. A smaller goiter size, a longer time interval between the 1st and 2nd RAI therapies, and a longer ATD discontinuation period predicted remission after the 2nd RAI therapy. Finally, in 78 patients who failed the 2nd RAI therapy, the mean ATD dosage significantly reduced 5.1 mg over 12 months.
Conclusion
Repeated RAI therapy can be a good therapeutic option, especially in patients with smaller goiters and those who are more responsive to the 1st RAI therapy.

Citations

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  • The Early Changes in Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin Bioassay over Anti-Thyroid Drug Treatment Could Predict Prognosis of Graves’ Disease
    Jin Yu, Han-Sang Baek, Chaiho Jeong, Kwanhoon Jo, Jeongmin Lee, Jeonghoon Ha, Min Hee Kim, Jungmin Lee, Dong-Jun Lim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(3): 338.     CrossRef
  • Effect of liver dysfunction on outcome of radioactive iodine therapy for Graves’ disease
    Yuyang Ze, Fei Shao, Xuefeng Feng, Shanmei Shen, Yan Bi, Dalong Zhu, Xiaowen Zhang
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Endocrinol Metab : Endocrinology and Metabolism