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Volume 35(3); September 2020
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Review Articles
Obesity and Metabolism
Metabolically Healthy and Unhealthy Normal Weight and Obesity
Norbert Stefan
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):487-493.   Published online August 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.301
  • 9,270 View
  • 440 Download
  • 31 Web of Science
  • 32 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Increased fat mass is an established risk factor for the cardiometabolic diseases type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is associated with increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. However, also very low fat mass associates with such an increased risk. Whether impaired metabolic health, characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and subclinical inflammation, may explain part of the elevated risk of cardiometabolic diseases that is found in many subjects with very low fat mass, as it does in many obese subjects, is unknown. An important pathomechanism of impaired metabolic health is disproportionate fat distribution. In this article the risk of cardiometabolic diseases and mortality in subjects with metabolically healthy and unhealthy normal weight and obesity is summarized. Furthermore, the change of metabolic health during a longer period of follow-up and its impact on cardiometabolic diseases is being discussed. Finally, the implementation of the concept of metabolic health in daily clinical practice is being highlighted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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  • Precision medicine in complex diseases—Molecular subgrouping for improved prediction and treatment stratification
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  • Lipid droplet biogenesis and functions in health and disease
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  • Molecular Mechanisms for the Vicious Cycle between Insulin Resistance and the Inflammatory Response in Obesity
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  • Hyperleptinemia as a marker of various phenotypes of obesity and overweight in women with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus
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    Rheumatology Science and Practice.2023; 61(3): 339.     CrossRef
  • Predictable Representation of Metabolic Synthesis Pathways of Vitamins and Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Obese Adults
    A. V. Shestopalov, L. A. Ganenko, I. M. Kolesnikova, T. V. Grigoryeva, I. Yu. Vasilyev, Yu. L. Naboka, N. I. Volkova, O. V. Borisenko, S. A. Roumiantsev
    Journal of Evolutionary Biochemistry and Physiology.2023; 59(5): 1510.     CrossRef
  • PREDICTION OF VITAMINS AND SHORT-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS SYNTHESIS PATHWAYS IN OBESE ADULTS
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  • Metabolically unhealthy individuals, either with obesity or not, have a higher risk of critical coronavirus disease 2019 outcomes than metabolically healthy individuals without obesity
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    Metabolism.2022; 128: 154894.     CrossRef
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    Boyoung Park
    Journal of Gynecologic Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • Relationships Between Metabolic Body Composition Status and Rapid Kidney Function Decline in a Community-Based Population: A Prospective Observational Study
    Shao-Chi Chu, Po-Hsi Wang, Kuan-Ying Lu, Chia-Chun Ko, Yun-Hsuan She, Chin-Chan Lee, I-Wen Wu, Chiao-Yin Sun, Heng-Jung Hsu, Heng-Chih Pan
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  • Dissecting the clinical relevance of polygenic risk score for obesity—a cross-sectional, longitudinal analysis
    Eun Kyung Choe, Manu Shivakumar, Seung Mi Lee, Anurag Verma, Dokyoon Kim
    International Journal of Obesity.2022; 46(9): 1686.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic and Obesity Phenotype Trajectories in Taiwanese Medical Personnel
    Hsin-Yun Chang, Jer-Hao Chang, Yin-Fan Chang, Chih-Hsing Wu, Yi-Ching Yang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(13): 8184.     CrossRef
  • Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Impact of Early Metabolic Impairment: Interplay between Dysbiosis and Adipose Inflammation
    Haneen S. Dwaib, Ibrahim AlZaim, Ghina Ajouz, Ali H. Eid, Ahmed El-Yazbi
    Molecular Pharmacology.2022; 102(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Reduced leukocyte mitochondrial copy number in metabolic syndrome and metabolically healthy obesity
    Rachel Agius, Nikolai Paul Pace, Stephen Fava
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in BMI and physical activity from youth to adulthood distinguish normal-weight, metabolically obese adults from those who remain healthy
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  • Metabolically healthy obesity: it is time to consider its dynamic changes
    Yun Kyung Cho, Chang Hee Jung
    Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy.2022; 4(4): 123.     CrossRef
  • Obesity as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer—The Role of miRNA
    Karolina Hanusek, Jakub Karczmarski, Anna Litwiniuk, Katarzyna Urbańska, Filip Ambrozkiewicz, Andrzej Kwiatkowski, Lidia Martyńska, Anita Domańska, Wojciech Bik, Agnieszka Paziewska
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Close layer
Miscellaneous
WD40-Repeat Proteins in Ciliopathies and Congenital Disorders of Endocrine System
Yeonjoo Kim, Soo-Hyun Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):494-506.   Published online September 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.302
  • 15,028 View
  • 201 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
WD40-repeat (WDR)-containing proteins constitute an evolutionarily conserved large protein family with a broad range of biological functions. In human proteome, WDR makes up one of the most abundant protein-protein interaction domains. Members of the WDR protein family play important roles in nearly all major cellular signalling pathways. Mutations of WDR proteins have been associated with various human pathologies including neurological disorders, cancer, obesity, ciliopathies and endocrine disorders. This review provides an updated overview of the biological functions of WDR proteins and their mutations found in congenital disorders. We also highlight the significant role of WDR proteins in ciliopathies and endocrine disorders. The new insights may help develop therapeutic approaches targeting WDR motifs.

Citations

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Close layer
Miscellaneous
Systems Biology: A Multi-Omics Integration Approach to Metabolism and the Microbiome
Jang Won Son, Saeed Shoaie, Sunjae Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):507-514.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.303
  • 6,665 View
  • 290 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The complex and dynamic nature of human physiology, as exemplified by metabolism, has often been overlooked due to the lack of quantitative and systems approaches. Recently, systems biology approaches have pushed the boundaries of our current understanding of complex biochemical, physiological, and environmental interactions, enabling proactive medicine in the near future. From this perspective, we review how state-of-the-art computational modelling of human metabolism, i.e., genome-scale metabolic modelling, could be used to identify the metabolic footprints of diseases, to guide the design of personalized treatments, and to estimate the microbiome contributions to host metabolism. These state-of-the-art models can serve as a scaffold for integrating multi-omics data, thereby enabling the identification of signatures of dysregulated metabolism by systems approaches. For example, increased plasma mannose levels due to decreased uptake in the liver have been identified as a potential biomarker of early insulin resistance by multi-omics approaches. In addition, we also review the emerging axis of human physiology and the human microbiome, discussing its contribution to host metabolism and quantitative approaches to study its variations in individuals.

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Close layer
Thyroid
Mechanisms of TERT Reactivation and Its Interaction with BRAFV600E
Young Shin Song, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):515-525.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.304
  • 8,012 View
  • 198 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, which is repressed in most differentiated human cells, can be reactivated by somatic TERT alterations and epigenetic modulations. Moreover, the recruitment, accessibility, and binding of transcription factors also affect the regulation of TERT expression. Reactivated TERT contributes to the development and progression of cancer through telomere lengthening-dependent and independent ways. In particular, because of recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, studies on genomic alterations in various cancers that cause increased TERT transcriptional activity have been actively conducted. TERT reactivation has been reported to be associated with poor prognosis in several cancers, and TERT promoter mutations are among the most potent prognostic markers in thyroid cancer. In particular, when a TERT promoter mutation coexists with the BRAFV600E mutation, these mutations exert synergistic effects on a poor prognosis. Efforts have been made to uncover the mechanisms of these synergistic interactions. In this review, we discuss the role of TERT reactivation in tumorigenesis, the mechanisms of TERT reactivation across all human cancers and in thyroid cancer, and the mechanisms of interactions between BRAFV600E and TERT promoter mutations.

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Close layer
Hypothalamus and Pituitary gland
Current National and International Guidelines for the Management of Male Hypogonadism: Helping Clinicians to Navigate Variation in Diagnostic Criteria and Treatment Recommendations
Ahmed Al-Sharefi, Richard Quinton
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):526-540.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.760
  • 9,679 View
  • 509 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Male hypogonadism—rebadged by some as testosterone deficiency syndrome—is a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of increasing worldwide interest. Organic male hypogonadism—usually permanent—is well-established, but aging men may also exhibit lower serum testosterone levels; principally due to burden of extra-gonadal comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, but with an underlying intact hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis capable of springing back into operation once comorbidities are addressed. Despite encouraging observational data and plausible theoretical underpinning, evidence for efficacy and safety of testosterone in this “aging” group of men is lacking; addressing comorbid illnesses remains the key priority instead. Nevertheless, in recent years, accumulation of misleading information online has triggered a global tsunami of testosterone prescriptions. Despite this, many men with organic hypogonadism remain undiagnosed or untreated; many more face a diagnostic odyssey before achieving care by the appropriate specialist. As testosterone therapy is not without risk several clinical practice guidelines have been published specialist societies to guide physicians on best practice. However, these are heterogeneous in key areas, reflecting divergent approaches to the same evidence basis. Herein, we navigate the major clinical practice guidelines on male hypogonadism and test their respective recommendations against current best evidence.

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Close layer
Diabetes
Lessons from Use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems in Digital Healthcare
Hun-Sung Kim, Kun-Ho Yoon
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):541-548.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.675
  • 7,012 View
  • 184 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
We live in a digital world where a variety of wearable medical devices are available. These technologies enable us to measure our health in our daily lives. It is increasingly possible to manage our own health directly through data gathered from these wearable devices. Likewise, healthcare professionals have also been able to indirectly monitor patients’ health. Healthcare professionals have accepted that digital technologies will play an increasingly important role in healthcare. Wearable technologies allow better collection of personal medical data, which healthcare professionals can use to improve the quality of healthcare provided to the public. The use of continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) is the most representative and desirable case in the adoption of digital technology in healthcare. Using the case of CGMS and examining its use from the perspective of healthcare professionals, this paper discusses the necessary adjustments required in clinical practices. There is a need for various stakeholders, such as medical staff, patients, industry partners, and policy-makers, to utilize and harness the potential of digital technology.

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    Seo Yeon Baik, Hakyoung Park, Jiwon Shinn, Hun-Sung Kim
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    Raeun Kim, Hakyoung Park, Jiwon Shinn, Hun-Sung Kim
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    Olena Litvinova, Magdalena Eitenberger, Aylin Bilir, Andy Wai Kan Yeung, Emil D. Parvanov, ArunSundar MohanaSundaram, Jarosław Olav Horbańczuk, Atanas G. Atanasov, Harald Willschke
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    Hun-Sung Kim
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Close layer
Editorial
Bone Metabolism
Why Do We Need Proactive Management for Fracture Prevention in Long-Term Glucocorticoid Users?
Han Seok Choi
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):549-551.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.308
  • 3,498 View
  • 74 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
Close layer
Original Articles
Clinical Study
The Prevalence and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults with Disabilities in Korea
Inha Jung, Hyemi Kwon, Se Eun Park, Kyung-Do Han, Yong-Gyu Park, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):552-561.   Published online July 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.653
  • 8,179 View
  • 188 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
People with disabilities are at risk of secondary conditions such as diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk of type 2 diabetes in South Korea, especially among people with all types of disabilities.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service, with two disabilityfree controls matched for each participant with disabilities by age and sex. Information regarding the type, severity and grade of disabilities was obtained based on the National Disability Registry. Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes was defined according to the following criteria: presence of International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification codes E11, E12, E13, or E14 and claims for at least one oral anti-diabetic agent or insulin at baseline, or fasting glucose level ≥126 mg/dL.
Results
We included 1,297,806 participants with disabilities and 2,943,719 control. Out of 4,241,525 participants, 841,990 (19.9%) were diagnosed with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes was higher in the disability group compared with individuals without disabilities (23.1% vs. 18.4%). The odds of having diabetes was higher in the disability group compared with the control group (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.33 to 1.34). The results showed higher prevalence of diabetes in the mildly disabled group (23.2%) than in the severely disabled group (22.7%).
Conclusion
The prevalence and risk of diabetes were higher in people with disabilities compared with the general population. Physicians and public health authorities should focus on people with disabilities for proper diabetes management.

Citations

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  • Widening disparities in the national prevalence of diabetes mellitus for people with disabilities in South Korea
    I. Hwang, S.Y. Kim, Y.Y. Kim, J.H. Park
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    You-Bin Lee, Hyewon Kim, Jungkuk Lee, Dongwoo Kang, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim, Hong Jin Jeon, Kyu Yeon Hur
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    You-Bin Lee, Hyewon Kim, Jungkuk Lee, Dongwoo Kang, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim, Hong Jin Jeon, Kyu Yeon Hur
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(1): 122.     CrossRef
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    Hye Jin Nam, Ju Young Yoon, Wen-Jun Tu
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(3): e0299971.     CrossRef
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    Seungwoo Cha, Won Kee Chang, Hee-Mun Cho, Kyungdo Han, Nam-Jong Paik, Sohyun Kwon, Won-Seok Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hin Moi Youn, Dong-Woo Choi, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
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    Jinwook Bahk, Hee-Yeon Kang, Young-Ho Khang
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    Inha Jung, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
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Close layer
Clinical Study
Effects of Systemic Glucocorticoid Use on Fracture Risk: A Population-Based Study
Ji Weon Koh, Junkang Kim, Hyemin Cho, Yong-Chan Ha, Tae-Young Kim, Young-Kyun Lee, Ha Young Kim, Sunmee Jang
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):562-570.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.659
  • 4,989 View
  • 178 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Long-term glucocorticoid use increases fracture risk by reducing bone mass. This study evaluated the relationship between hip and vertebral fractures and the total amount of systematic glucocorticoid use.
Methods
We randomly selected 1,896,159 people aged 20 to 100 years who participated in the National Health Checkup program in 2006. The amount of glucocorticoids prescribed was calculated based on the defined daily dose (DDD). The total DDD was obtained by adding oral and parenteral glucocorticoids for 6 months from the index date. Subjects were categorized into four groups according to total glucocorticoid DDDs: non-users (DDDs=0), low users (0< DDDs ≤45), intermediate users (45< DDDs ≤90), and high users (90< DDDs). We followed them for 2 years. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the effects of the total amount of glucocorticoid use on hip and vertebral fractures.
Results
Higher glucocorticoid use was associated with a higher risk of vertebral fracture. Relative to non-users, the vertebral fracture risk was 1.39 times higher in the low-user group, 1.94 times higher in the intermediate-user group, and 2.43 times higher in the highuser group. The risk of hip fracture was 1.72 times higher in intermediate users and 3.28 times higher in high users than in non-users.
Conclusion
As the amount of glucocorticoid use for 6 months increased, the risk of hip and vertebral fractures became higher. In order to prevent fractures, it is necessary for doctors to evaluate the total amount of glucocorticoid prescribed to the patient and to provide appropriate treatment.

Citations

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  • Average daily glucocorticoid dose, number of prescription days, and cumulative dose in the initial 90 days of glucocorticoid therapy are associated with subsequent hip and clinical vertebral fracture risk: a retrospective cohort study using a nationwide h
    Masayuki Iki, Kenji Fujimori, Shinichi Nakatoh, Junko Tamaki, Shigeyuki Ishii, Nobukazu Okimoto, Hironori Imano, Sumito Ogawa
    Osteoporosis International.2024; 35(5): 805.     CrossRef
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    Sung Hye Kong, Ae Jeong Jo, Chan Mi Park, Kyun Ik Park, Ji Eun Yun, Jung Hee Kim
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bad to the bones: prescribing of drugs for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients on chronic glucocorticoids
    Sarah J. Billups, Vinh K Thai, Jacob Denkins, Ian C. Dettman, Micol S. Rothman
    Archives of Osteoporosis.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hyung Jin Ahn, Ye-Jee Kim, Ho-Su Lee, Jin Hwa Park, Sung Wook Hwang, Dong-Hoon Yang, Byong Duk Ye, Jeong-Sik Byeon, Seung-Jae Myung, Suk-Kyun Yang, Beom-Jun Kim, Sang Hyoung Park
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2022; 20(5): e1022.     CrossRef
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    Madhuni Herath, Bente Langdahl, Peter R. Ebeling, Frances Milat
    Clinical Endocrinology.2022; 96(4): 460.     CrossRef
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    Hongmin Chu, Bo-Hyoung Jang, GaYoon Kim, Seowoo Bae, Hyeju Lee, Seonghee Nam, Jeonghoon Ahn
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(9): e062537.     CrossRef
  • Why Do We Need Proactive Management for Fracture Prevention in Long-Term Glucocorticoid Users?
    Han Seok Choi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2020; 35(3): 549.     CrossRef
Close layer
Clinical Study
A Phase II Multi-Center, Non-Randomized, Parallel Group, Non-Inferiority Study to Compare the Efficacy of No Radioactive Iodine Remnant Ablation to Remnant Ablation Treatment in Low- to Intermediate-Risk of Papillary Thyroid Cancer: The MOREthyroid Trial Protocol
Eun Kyung Lee, You Jin Lee, Young Joo Park, Jae Hoon Moon, Ka Hee Yi, Koon Soon Kim, Joo Hee Lee, Sun Wook Cho, Jungnam Joo, Yul Hwangbo, Sujeong Go, Do Joon Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):571-577.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.681
  • 4,707 View
  • 119 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Radioactive iodine (RAI) remnant ablation is recommended in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and extrathyroidal extension or central lymph node metastasis. However, there exists little evidence about the necessity of remnant ablation in PTC patients with low- to intermediate-risk, those have been increasing in recent decades.
Methods
This multicenter, prospective, non-randomized, parallel group clinical trial will enroll 310 eligible patients with low- to intermediate-risk of thyroid cancer. Inclusion criteria are patients who recently underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC with 3 or less tumors of size 1≤ to ≤2 cm with no microscopic extension and N0/x, or size ≤2 cm with microscopic extension and/or N1a (number of lymph node ≤3, size of tumor foci ≤0.2 cm, and lymph node ratio <0.4). Patients choose to undergo RAI ablation (131I, dose 1.1 GBq) or diagnostic whole-body scan (DxWBS) (131I or 123I, dose 0.074 to 0.222 GBq), followed by subsequent measurement of stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) within 1 year. Survey for quality of life (QOL) will be performed at baseline and at 1 year after follow-up. The total enrollment period is 5 years, and patients will be followed up for 1 year. The primary endpoint is the non-inferiority of surgery alone to surgery with ablation in terms of biochemical remission (BCR) rate (sTg ≤2 ng/mL) without evidence of structural recurrence. The secondary endpoint was the difference of QOL.
Conclusion
This study will evaluate whether surgery alone achieves similar BCR and improved QOL compared to RAI ablation in patients with low- to intermediate-risk PTC within 1 year.
Close layer
Clinical Study
Relationship of Sarcopenia with Microcirculation Measured by Skin Perfusion Pressure in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Chan-Hee Jung, Yoon Young Cho, Dughyun Choi, Bo-Yeon Kim, Chul-Hee Kim, Ji-Oh Mok
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):578-586.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.679
  • 5,459 View
  • 122 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Few studies have examined the relationship of sarcopenia with the microcirculation. The current study investigated the relationship of sarcopenia with microcirculatory function, as assessed by skin perfusion pressure (SPP), in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients.
Methods
In total, 102 T2DM patients who underwent SPP measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. SPP was assessed using the laser Doppler technique. Sarcopenia was defined as low height-adjusted appendicular muscle mass (men, <7 kg/m2; women, <5.7 kg/m2) using BIA. We divided the participants into two groups based on SPP (≤50 and >50 mm Hg), and an SPP below 50 mm Hg was considered to reflect impaired microcirculation.
Results
Fourteen patients (13.7%) were diagnosed with impaired microcirculatory function of the lower limb based on SPP. The prevalence of sarcopenia in all subjects was 11.8%, but the percentage of patients with an SPP ≤50 mm Hg who had sarcopenia was more than triple that of patients with an SPP >50 mm Hg (28.6% vs. 9.1%, P=0.036). A significant positive correlation was found between SPP and appendicular muscle mass adjusted for height (P=0.041 for right-sided SPP). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patients with sarcopenia had an odds ratio of 4.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 24.9) for having an SPP ≤50 mm Hg even after adjustment for confounding factors.
Conclusion
These results suggest that sarcopenia may be significantly associated with impaired microcirculation in patients with T2DM. Nonetheless, the small number of patients and wide CI require cautious interpretation of the results.

Citations

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  • Preclinical study of diabetic foot ulcers: From pathogenesis to vivo/vitro models and clinical therapeutic transformation
    Yuqing Du, Jie Wang, Weijing Fan, Renyan Huang, Hongfei Wang, Guobin Liu
    International Wound Journal.2023; 20(10): 4394.     CrossRef
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    Stefano Sbrignadello, Christian Göbl, Andrea Tura
    Nutrients.2022; 14(9): 1864.     CrossRef
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    Li-Wei Wu, Te OuYoung, Yu-Chih Chiu, Ho-Feng Hsieh, Hsin Hsiu
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yaqin Ai, Ruoxin Xu, Lingping Liu
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Close layer
Clinical Study
Vandetanib for the Management of Advanced Medullary Thyroid Cancer: A Real-World Multicenter Experience
Mijin Kim, Jee Hee Yoon, Jonghwa Ahn, Min Ji Jeon, Hee Kyung Kim, Dong Jun Lim, Ho-Cheol Kang, In Joo Kim, Young Kee Shong, Tae Yong Kim, Bo Hyun Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):587-594.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.687
  • 5,774 View
  • 148 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Vandetanib is the most widely used tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). However, only limited data regarding its use outside clinical trials are available. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vandetanib in patients with advanced MTC in routine clinical practice.
Methods
In this multicenter retrospective study, 12 patients with locally advanced or metastatic MTC treated with vandetanib at four tertiary hospitals were included. The primary outcome was the objective response rate (ORR) based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicities were also evaluated.
Results
Eleven patients (92%) had distant metastasis and 10 (83%) had disease progression at enrollment. Partial response was observed in five patients (ORR, 42%) and stable disease lasting ≥24 weeks was reported in an additional five patients (83%). During the median 31.7 months of follow-up, disease progression was seen in five patients (42%); of these, two died due to disease progression. The median PFS was 25.9 months, while the median OS was not reached. All patients experienced adverse events (AEs) which were generally consistent with the known safety profile of vandetanib. Vandetanib was discontinued in two patients due to skin toxicity.
Conclusion
Consistent with the phase III trial, this study confirmed the efficacy of vandetanib for advanced MTC in terms of both ORR and PFS in the real-world setting. Vandetanib was well tolerated in the majority of patients, and there were no fatal AEs.

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  • Metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC): disease course, treatment modalities and factors predisposing for drug resistance
    Katerina Saltiki, George Simeakis, Olga Karapanou, Stavroula A. Paschou, Maria Alevizaki
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    Han-Sang Baek, Jeonghoon Ha, Seunggyun Ha, Ja Seong Bae, Chan Kwon Jung, Dong-Jun Lim
    Current Oncology.2023; 30(3): 3020.     CrossRef
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    Nicolas Sahakian, Frédéric Castinetti, Pauline Romanet
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    Antonio Matrone, Carla Gambale, Alessandro Prete, Rossella Elisei
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    Yujie Zhang, Zhichao Xing, Tianyou Liu, Minghai Tang, Li Mi, Jingqiang Zhu, Wenshuang Wu, Tao Wei
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    Carla Colombo, Simone De Leo, Matteo Trevisan, Noemi Giancola, Anna Scaltrito, Laura Fugazzola
    Frontiers in Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Angiogenic Balance and Its Implications in Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases: An Overview
    Cătălina Ionescu, Bogdan Oprea, Georgeta Ciobanu, Milena Georgescu, Ramona Bică, Garofiţa-Olivia Mateescu, Fidan Huseynova, Veronique Barragan-Montero
    Medicina.2022; 58(7): 903.     CrossRef
  • Reassessing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in anti-angiogenic cancer therapy
    Tobiloba C. Elebiyo, Damilare Rotimi, Ikponmwosa O. Evbuomwan, Rotdelmwa Filibus Maimako, Matthew Iyobhebhe, Oluwafemi Adeleke Ojo, Olarewaju M. Oluba, Oluyomi S. Adeyemi
    Cancer Treatment and Research Communications.2022; 32: 100620.     CrossRef
  • Current Guidelines for Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma
    Mijin Kim, Bo Hyun Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(3): 514.     CrossRef
  • Recent advances in precision medicine for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer
    Jolanta Krajewska, Aleksandra Kukulska, Malgorzata Oczko-Wojciechowska, Barbara Jarzab
    Expert Review of Precision Medicine and Drug Development.2021; 6(5): 307.     CrossRef
  • Functional evaluation of vandetanib metabolism by CYP3A4 variants and potential drug interactions in vitro
    Mingming Han, Xiaodan Zhang, Zhize Ye, Jing Wang, Jianchang Qian, Guoxin Hu, Jianping Cai
    Chemico-Biological Interactions.2021; 350: 109700.     CrossRef
  • Nephrotoxicity in advanced thyroid cancer treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors: An update
    Alice Nervo, Francesca Retta, Alberto Ragni, Alessandro Piovesan, Alberto Mella, Luigi Biancone, Marco Manganaro, Marco Gallo, Emanuela Arvat
    Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology.2021; 168: 103533.     CrossRef
Close layer
Clinical Study
Fasting Plasma Glucose Level Independently Predicts the Mortality of Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 Infection: A Multicenter, Retrospective Cohort Study
Min Cheol Chang, Jong-Moon Hwang, Jae-Han Jeon, Sang Gyu Kwak, Donghwi Park, Jun Sung Moon
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):595-601.   Published online August 26, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.719
  • 7,083 View
  • 182 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic, which prompts a consensus for the necessity to seek risk factors for this critical disease. Risk factors affecting mortality of the disease remain elusive. Diabetes and hyperglycemia are known to negatively affect a host’s antiviral immunity. We evaluated the relationship between a history of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and mortality among severely ill patients with COVID-19.
Methods
This was a retrospective cohort study that assessed 106 adult inpatients (aged ≥18 years) from two tertiary hospitals in Daegu, South Korea. The participants were transferred to tertiary hospitals because their medical condition required immediate intensive care. The demographic and laboratory data were compared between COVID-19 patients who survived and those who did not.
Results
Compared with the survivor group, age, and the proportions of diabetes, chronic lung disease and FPG were significantly higher in the deceased group. In the Cox proportional hazards regression model for survival analysis, FPG level and age were identified as significant predictors of mortality (P<0.05). The threshold values for predicting high mortality were age >68 years and FPG of 168 mg/dL, respectively. Among those without diabetes, high FPG remained a significant predictor of mortality (P<0.04).
Conclusion
High FPG levels significantly predicted mortality in COVID-19, regardless of a known history of diabetes. These results suggest intensive monitoring should be provided to COVID-19 patients who have a high FPG level.

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  • Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels at the Time of Admission Predict 90-Day Mortality in Patients with Viral Pneumonia. A Prospective Study
    Jie Xu, Jianyu Zhao, Liyuan Wu, Xinxin Lu
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    Evangelia Tzeravini, Eleftherios Stratigakos, Chris Siafarikas, Anastasios Tentolouris, Nikolaos Tentolouris
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    Eun Yeong Ha, Seung Min Chung, Il Rae Park, Yin Young Lee, Eun Young Choi, Jun Sung Moon
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    Abraham Degarege, Zaeema Naveed, Josiane Kabayundo, David Brett-Major
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    Saeid Safiri, Seyed Aria Nejadghaderi, Nahid Karamzad, Jay S. Kaufman, Kristin Carson-Chahhoud, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, Mark J. M. Sullman, Mohammad Reza Beyranvand, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Amir Almasi-Hashiani, Gary S. Collins, Ali-Asghar Kolahi
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    Maria Chiara Pelle, Isabella Zaffina, Michele Provenzano, Giovenale Moirano, Franco Arturi
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    Alon Y. Mazori, Ilana Ramer Bass, Lili Chan, Kusum S. Mathews, Deena R. Altman, Aparna Saha, Howard Soh, Huei Hsun Wen, Sonali Bose, Emily Leven, Jing Gennie Wang, Gohar Mosoyan, Pattharawin Pattharanitima, Giampaolo Greco, Emily J. Gallagher
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    Li Zhang, Jie Hou, Fu-Zhe Ma, Jia Li, Shuai Xue, Zhong-Gao Xu
    Archives of Virology.2021; 166(8): 2071.     CrossRef
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    M Zuin, G Rigatelli, C Bilato, C Cervellati, G Zuliani, L Roncon
    QJM: An International Journal of Medicine.2021; 114(6): 390.     CrossRef
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    Min Cheol Chang, Tae Uk Kim, Donghwi Park
    Medicine.2021; 100(19): e25917.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid Hormone Profile and Its Prognostic Impact on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korean Patients
    Jiyeon Ahn, Min Kyung Lee, Jae Hyuk Lee, Seo Young Sohn
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(4): 769.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, smoking and COVID-19-related mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
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Clinical Study
Clinical Outcomes of N1b Papillary Thyroid Cancer Patients Treated with Two Different Doses of Radioiodine Ablation Therapy
Meihua Jin, Jonghwa Ahn, Yu-Mi Lee, Tae-Yon Sung, Won Gu Kim, Tae Yong Kim, Jin-Sook Ryu, Won Bae Kim, Young Kee Shong, Min Ji Jeon
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):602-609.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.741
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The optimal dose of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for N1b papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is controversial. We evaluated the clinical outcome of N1b PTC patients treated with either 100 or 150 mCi of RAI.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed N1b PTC patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and postoperative RAI therapy at a tertiary referral center between 2012 and 2017. As the baseline characteristics differed between treatment groups, we performed exact matching for various pathological factors according to RAI dose. We evaluated the response to therapy and recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the matched patients. Structural recurrent/persistent disease was defined as new structural disease detected after initial therapy, which was confirmed by cytology or pathology.
Results
Of the total 436 patients, 37 (8.5%) received 100 mCi of RAI and 399 (91.5%) received 150 mCi of RAI. After an exact 1:3 matching, 34 patients in the 100 mCi group and 100 patients in the 150 mCi group remained. There was no significant difference in response to therapy between the groups in the matched population (P=0.63). An excellent response was achieved in 70.6% (n=24) of patients in the 100 mCi group and 76.0% (n=76) in the 150 mCi group. Two (5.9%) patients in the 100 mCi group and four (4.0%) in the 150 mCi group had recurrence and there was no significant difference in RFS between the groups in the matched population (P=0.351).
Conclusion
There were no differences in response to therapy and RFS in N1b PTC patients according to RAI dose.
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Clinical Study
Serum Transferrin Predicts New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes in Koreans: A 4-Year Retrospective Longitudinal Study
Jong Dai Kim, Dong-Mee Lim, Keun-Young Park, Se Eun Park, Eun Jung Rhee, Cheol-Young Park, Won-Young Lee, Ki Won Oh
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(3):610-617.   Published online September 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.721
  • 4,443 View
  • 99 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
It is well known that high serum ferritin, a marker of iron storage, predicts incident type 2 diabetes. Limited information is available on the association between transferrin, another marker of iron metabolism, and type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the association between transferrin and incident type 2 diabetes.
Methods
Total 31,717 participants (mean age, 40.4±7.2 years) in a health screening program in 2005 were assessed via cross-sectional analysis. We included 30,699 subjects who underwent medical check-up in 2005 and 2009 and did not have type 2 diabetes at baseline in this retrospective longitudinal analysis.
Results
The serum transferrin level was higher in the type 2 diabetes group than in the non-type 2 diabetes group (58.32±7.74 μmol/L vs. 56.17±7.96 μmol/L, P<0.001). Transferrin correlated with fasting serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in the correlational analysis (r=0.062, P<0.001 and r=0.077, P<0.001, respectively) after full adjustment for covariates. Transferrin was more closely related to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance than to homeostasis model assessment of β cell function (r=0.042, P<0.001 and r=–0.019, P=0.004, respectively) after full adjustment. Transferrin predicted incident type 2 diabetes in non-type 2 diabetic subjects in a multivariate linear regression analysis; the odds ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) of the 3rd tertile compared to that in the 1st tertile of transferrin for incident diabetes was 1.319 (95% CI, 1.082 to 1.607) after full adjustment (P=0.006).
Conclusion
Transferrin is positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes in Koreans.

Citations

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