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Wonjin Kim  (Kim W) 3 Articles
Clinical Study
Obesity and Hyperglycemia in Korean Men with Klinefelter Syndrome: The Korean Endocrine Society Registry
Seung Jin Han, Kyung-Soo Kim, Wonjin Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Yong-ho Lee, Ji Sun Nam, Ji A Seo, Bu Kyung Kim, Jihyun Lee, Jin Ook Chung, Min-Hee Kim, Tae-Seo Sohn, Han Seok Choi, Seong Bin Hong, Yoon-Sok Chung
Endocrinol Metab. 2016;31(4):598-603.   Published online December 20, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2016.31.4.598
  • 5,252 View
  • 34 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of obesity in Korean men with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) and the associated risk factors for obesity and hyperglycemia.

Methods

Data were collected retrospectively from medical records from 11 university hospitals in Korea between 1994 and 2014. Subjects aged ≥18 years with newly diagnosed KS were enrolled. The following parameters were recorded at baseline before treatment: chief complaint, height, weight, fasting glucose level, lipid panel, blood pressure, testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, karyotyping patterns, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia.

Results

Data were analyzed from 376 of 544 initially enrolled patients. The rate of the 47 XXY chromosomal pattern was 94.1%. The prevalence of obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) in Korean men with KS was 42.6%. The testosterone level was an independent risk factor for obesity and hyperglycemia.

Conclusion

Obesity is common in Korean men with KS. Hypogonadism in patients with KS was associated with obesity and hyperglycemia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A dual-center study of predictive factors for sperm retrieval through microdissection testicular sperm extraction and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes in men with non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome
    Jong Hyeun Baeck, Tae Jin Kim, Tae Heon Kim, Seung-Ryeol Lee, Dong Soo Park, Hwang Kwon, Ji Eun Shin, Dong Hyeon Lee, Young Dong Yu
    Investigative and Clinical Urology.2023; 64(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents and young adults with Klinefelter syndrome – a pilot study
    Julia Spiekermann, Kathrin Sinningen, Beatrice Hanusch, Michaela Kleber, Michael M. Schündeln, Cordula Kiewert, Heide Siggelkow, Jakob Höppner, Corinna Grasemann
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metabolic Profile in a Cohort of Young Sicilian Patients with Klinefelter’s Syndrome: The Role of Irisin
    Stefano Radellini, Valentina Guarnotta, Vincenzo Sciabica, Giuseppe Pizzolanti, Carla Giordano, Vito Angelo Giagulli
    International Journal of Endocrinology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic and Nutritional Aspects in Paediatric Patients with Klinefelter Syndrome: A Narrative Review
    Chiara Mameli, Giulia Fiore, Arianna Sangiorgio, Marta Agostinelli, Giulia Zichichi, Gianvincenzo Zuccotti, Elvira Verduci
    Nutrients.2022; 14(10): 2107.     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter syndrome in an adolescent with severe obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia, successfully treated with testosterone replacement therapy
    Shota Fukuhara, Jun Mori, Hisakazu Nakajima
    Clinical Pediatric Endocrinology.2021; 30(3): 127.     CrossRef
  • Glucose metabolic disorder in Klinefelter syndrome: a retrospective analysis in a single Chinese hospital and literature review
    Shixuan Liu, Tao Yuan, Shuoning Song, Shi Chen, Linjie Wang, Yong Fu, Yingyue Dong, Yan Tang, Weigang Zhao
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What Every Internist-Endocrinologist Should Know about Rare Genetic Syndromes in Order to Prevent Needless Diagnostics, Missed Diagnoses and Medical Complications: Five Years of ‘Internal Medicine for Rare Genetic Syndromes’
    Anna G. W. Rosenberg, Minke R. A. Pater, Karlijn Pellikaan, Kirsten Davidse, Anja A. Kattentidt-Mouravieva, Rogier Kersseboom, Anja G. Bos-Roubos, Agnies van Eeghen, José M. C. Veen, Jiske J. van der Meulen, Nina van Aalst-van Wieringen, Franciska M. E. H
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(22): 5457.     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter Syndrome and Diabetes
    Mark J. O’Connor, Emma A. Snyder, Frances J. Hayes
    Current Diabetes Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endocrine aspects of Klinefelter syndrome
    Adriana Herrera Lizarazo, Michelle McLoughlin, Maria G. Vogiatzi
    Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes & Obesity.2019; 26(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Sex differences in metabolism and cardiometabolic disorders
    Karthickeyan Chella Krishnan, Margarete Mehrabian, Aldons J. Lusis
    Current Opinion in Lipidology.2018; 29(5): 404.     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter Syndrome: Integrating Genetics, Neuropsychology, and Endocrinology
    Claus H Gravholt, Simon Chang, Mikkel Wallentin, Jens Fedder, Philip Moore, Anne Skakkebæk
    Endocrine Reviews.2018; 39(4): 389.     CrossRef
  • Sex differences in obesity, lipid metabolism, and inflammation—A role for the sex chromosomes?
    Temeka Zore, Maria Palafox, Karen Reue
    Molecular Metabolism.2018; 15: 35.     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter syndrome, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes: review of literature and clinical perspectives
    Andrea Salzano, Roberta D’Assante, Liam M. Heaney, Federica Monaco, Giuseppe Rengo, Pietro Valente, Daniela Pasquali, Eduardo Bossone, Daniele Gianfrilli, Andrea Lenzi, Antonio Cittadini, Alberto M. Marra, Raffaele Napoli
    Endocrine.2018; 61(2): 194.     CrossRef
  • Síndrome de Klinefelter y riesgo cardiovascular
    A. Yamaguchi, P. Knoblovits
    Hipertensión y Riesgo Vascular.2018; 35(4): 195.     CrossRef
  • Articles inEndocrinology and Metabolismin 2016
    Won-Young Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2017; 32(1): 62.     CrossRef
  • Sex differences in obesity: X chromosome dosage as a risk factor for increased food intake, adiposity and co-morbidities
    Karen Reue
    Physiology & Behavior.2017; 176: 174.     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter Syndrome with Morbid Obesity Before Bariatric Surgery: A Case Report
    Parisa Janmohammadi, Gholamreza Mohammadi-Farsani, Hana Arghavani, Mahmoud Arshad, Tayebeh Mokhber
    Journal of Minimally Invasive Surgical Sciences.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Klinefelter Syndrome and Metabolic Disorder
    Ji Cheol Bae
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2016; 31(4): 535.     CrossRef
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Bone Metabolism
Increased Sclerostin Levels after Further Ablation of Remnant Estrogen by Aromatase Inhibitors
Wonjin Kim, Yoonjung Chung, Se Hwa Kim, Sehee Park, Jae Hyun Bae, Gyuri Kim, Su Jin Lee, Jo Eun Kim, Byeong-Woo Park, Sung-Kil Lim, Yumie Rhee
Endocrinol Metab. 2015;30(1):58-64.   Published online March 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2015.30.1.58
  • 4,054 View
  • 35 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Sclerostin is a secreted Wnt inhibitor produced almost exclusively by osteocytes, which inhibits bone formation. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs), which reduce the conversion of steroids to estrogen, are used to treat endocrine-responsive breast cancer. As AIs lower estrogen levels, they increase bone turnover and lower bone mass. We analyzed changes in serum sclerostin levels in Korean women with breast cancer who were treated with an AI.

Methods

We included postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer (n=90; mean age, 57.7 years) treated with an AI, and compared them to healthy premenopausal women (n=36; mean age, 28.0 years). The subjects were randomly assigned to take either 5 mg alendronate with 0.5 µg calcitriol (n=46), or placebo (n=44) for 6 months.

Results

Postmenopausal women with breast cancer had significantly higher sclerostin levels compared to those in premenopausal women (27.8±13.6 pmol/L vs. 23.1±4.8 pmol/L, P<0.05). Baseline sclerostin levels positively correlated with either lumbar spine or total hip bone mineral density only in postmenopausal women (r=0.218 and r=0.233; P<0.05, respectively). Serum sclerostin levels increased by 39.9%±10.2% 6 months after AI use in postmenopausal women; however, no difference was observed between the alendronate and placebo groups (39.9%±10.2% vs. 55.9%±9.13%, P>0.05).

Conclusion

Serum sclerostin levels increased with absolute deficiency of residual estrogens in postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer who underwent AI therapy with concurrent bone loss.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Voluntary Wheel Running Partially Compensates for the Effects of Global Estrogen Receptor-α Knockout on Cortical Bone in Young Male Mice
    Rebecca K. Dirkes, Nathan C. Winn, Thomas J. Jurrissen, Dennis B. Lubahn, Victoria J. Vieira-Potter, Jaume Padilla, Pamela S. Hinton
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(4): 1734.     CrossRef
  • Role of Osteocytes in Cancer Progression in the Bone and the Associated Skeletal Disease
    Manish Adhikari, Jesús Delgado-Calle
    Current Osteoporosis Reports.2021; 19(3): 247.     CrossRef
  • Gestational and lactational exposure to BPA or BPS has minimal effects on skeletal outcomes in adult female mice
    Rebecca K. Dirkes, Rebecca J. Welly, Jiude Mao, Jessica Kinkade, Victoria J. Vieira-Potter, Cheryl S. Rosenfeld, Pamela S. Bruzina
    Bone Reports.2021; 15: 101136.     CrossRef
  • Modulation of bone turnover aberration: A target for management of primary osteoporosis in experimental rat model
    Enas A. Fouad-Elhady, Hadeer A. Aglan, Rasha E. Hassan, Hanaa H. Ahmed, Gilane M. Sabry
    Heliyon.2020; 6(2): e03341.     CrossRef
  • Aromatase inhibitors attenuate the effect of alendronate in women with breast cancer
    Sung Hye Kong, Jung Hee Kim, Sang Wan Kim, Chan Soo Shin
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism.2020; 38(5): 730.     CrossRef
  • Global estrogen receptor-α knockout has differential effects on cortical and cancellous bone in aged male mice
    Rebecca K. Dirkes, Nathan C. Winn, Thomas J. Jurrissen, Dennis B. Lubahn, Victoria J. Vieira-Potter, Jaume Padilla, Pamela S. Hinton, Vance L. Trudeau
    FACETS.2020; 5(1): 328.     CrossRef
  • The Emerging Role of Osteocytes in Cancer in Bone
    Emily G Atkinson, Jesús Delgado‐Calle
    JBMR Plus.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of denosumab on low bone mineral density in postmenopausal Japanese women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors for non-metastatic breast cancer: 24-month results
    Katsuhiko Nakatsukasa, Hiroshi Koyama, Yoshimi Ouchi, Hisako Ono, Kouichi Sakaguchi, Takayuki Matsuda, Makoto Kato, Takashi Ishikawa, Kimito Yamada, Mana Yoshimura, Kei Koizumi, Teruhisa Sakurai, Hideo Shigematsu, Shunji Takahashi, Shinichiro Taira, Masat
    Breast Cancer.2019; 26(1): 106.     CrossRef
  • Association of Wnt Inhibitors, Bone Mineral Density and Lifestyle Parameters in Women with Breast Cancer Treated with Anastrozole Therapy
    Kristina Bojanić, Ines Bilić Ćurčić, Lucija Kuna, Tomislav Kizivat, Robert Smolic, Nikola Raguž Lučić, Kristina Kralik, Vatroslav Šerić, Gordana Ivanac, Sandra Tucak-Zorić, Aleksandar Včev, Martina Smolić
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2018; 7(9): 287.     CrossRef
  • Management of Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Bone Loss (AIBL) in postmenopausal women with hormone sensitive breast cancer: Joint position statement of the IOF, CABS, ECTS, IEG, ESCEO, IMS, and SIOG
    Peyman Hadji, Matti S. Aapro, Jean-Jacques Body, Michael Gnant, Maria Luisa Brandi, Jean Yves Reginster, M. Carola Zillikens, Claus-C. Glüer, Tobie de Villiers, Rod Baber, G. David Roodman, Cyrus Cooper, Bente Langdahl, Santiago Palacios, John Kanis, Nass
    Journal of Bone Oncology.2017; 7: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effects of raloxifene against letrozole-induced bone loss in chemically-induced model of menopause in mice
    Abul Kalam, Sushama Talegaonkar, Divya Vohora
    Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology.2017; 440: 34.     CrossRef
  • Sclerostin: an Emerging Target for the Treatment of Cancer-Induced Bone Disease
    Michelle M. McDonald, Jesus Delgado-Calle
    Current Osteoporosis Reports.2017; 15(6): 532.     CrossRef
  • Differential profile of letrozole and exemestane on bone turnover markers in vinylcyclohexene diepoxide treated ovotoxic female mice
    Abul Kalam, Sushama Talegaonkar, Divya Vohora
    Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology.2016; 30(5): 429.     CrossRef
  • Osteoblasts Are the Centerpiece of the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment
    Hyo Min Jeong, Sun Wook Cho, Serk In Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2016; 31(4): 485.     CrossRef
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A Case of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults Developed after Surgical Cure of Growth Hormone Secreting Pituitary Tumor.
Wonjin Kim, Jung Ho Kim, Youngsook Kim, Ji Hye Huh, Su Jin Lee, Mi Sung Park, Eun Yeong Choe, Jeong Kyung Park, Myung Won Lee, Jae Won Hong, Byung Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong Soo Cha, Eun Jig Lee, Hyun Chul Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2012;27(4):318-322.   Published online December 20, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2012.27.4.318
  • 2,024 View
  • 31 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acromegaly is generally caused by a benign growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. It is characterized by a wide range of complications; cardiovascular, respiratory, bone and joint, and metabolic complications. Among them, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus, due to GH-induced insulin resistance, has been reported in approximately 16-46% and 19-56%. They are usually improved following the treatment of acromegaly, surgical or medical therapy. We report a first case of 36-year-old man who was paradoxically diagnosed with GAD antibody positive latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) after the surgical cure of acromegaly.
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