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Sang Soo Chung  (Chung SS) 2 Articles
A Case of Metastatic Pulmonary Calcification in Primary Hyperparathyroidism.
Kwang Eun Lee, Hae Jin Kim, Si Hoon Lee, Sang Woon Bae, Eun Seok Kang, Hae Won Chung, Hye Sun Seo, Dae Jung Kim, Sang Soo Chung, Sun Jung Kim, Young Duk Song, Sung Kil Lim
J Korean Endocr Soc. 2002;17(4):583-588.   Published online August 1, 2002
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Metastatic calcification is the deposition of calcium, in previously normal tissue, as a result of elevated plasma calcium and phosphorus product levels and has been reported in patients with parathyroid adenoma, parathyroid carcinoma, hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure, vitamin D intoxication, and osteolytic bone tumors, such as multiple myelomas. The lungs are the most common site of metastatic calcification. We have experienced metastatic pulmonary calcification in a case of primary hyperparathyroidism. A 55-year old woman was admitted due to general weakness. From the laboratory evaluation, hypercalcemia and excess production of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were noted. technetium-99m-labelled sestamibi scintigraphy indicated an intense uptake in the lower pole area of the left thyroid gland, suggestive of a parathyroid adenoma. A technetium-99m phosphate (99mTc-MDP) bone scan showed increased uptakes in both lungs. A parathyroid lobectomy was performed, and primary hyperparathyroidism, due to a parathyroid adenoma, was finally diagnosed. A follow-up 99mTc-MDP bone scan showed the disappearance of the metastatic pulmonary calcification, with the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters normalizing after 6 months.
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2 Cases of Peripheral Nerve Tumors of Anterior Neck Simulating Thyroid Nodule.
Sung Kil Lim, Young Duk Song, Hyun Chul Lee, Kap Bum Huh, Kyung Rae Kim, Soo Yeon Nam, Byung Ki Choi, Sang Soo Chung, Kyung Wook Kim, So Rae Choi
J Korean Endocr Soc. 1998;13(4):640-645.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Peripheral nerve tumors are mostly benign and can arise on any nerve trunk or twig. Although peripheral nerve tumors can occur anywhere in the body, including the spinal roots and cauda equina, many cases are subcutaneous in location and present as a soft swelling, sometimes with a purplish discoloration of skin. There are two major catagories, schwannoma(neurilemmoma), and neurofibroma. Schwannomas are usually solitary and grow in the nerve sheath, rendering them relatively easy to dissect free. In contrast, neurofibromas tend to be multiple, grow in the endoneural substance, which renders them difficult to dissect, may undergo malignant changes, and are the hallmark of von Recklinghausens neurofibromatosis. Masses in the anterior part of neck may be initially thought to be thyroid nodule and then other cervical masses should be considered. The diagnosis rests on clinical suspicion and diagnostic support may be obtained by CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) and substraction angiography in the literature. After imaging, fine needle aspiration for cytology may be helpful. If they are resected unrecognized and/or without regard to their nerve origin, major and permanent nerve defects can unnecessarily occur. We experienced 2 cases of peripheral nerve tumors of anterior neck simulating a thyroid nodule.
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