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Min Joo Kim  (Kim MJ) 16 Articles
Thyroid
Clinical Outcomes of Repeated Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Graves’ Disease
Min Joo Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Ye An Kim, Hoon Sung Choi, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park, Bo Youn Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):524-532.   Published online June 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1418
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  • 1 Citations
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Background
Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy is a successful therapeutic modality for Graves’ disease. However, RAI therapy can fail, and RAI therapy after antithyroid drugs (ATDs) has a lower remission rate. Therefore, many patients require repeated RAI therapy. This study investigated the clinical outcomes of repeated RAI therapy for Graves’ disease.
Methods
Patients who underwent RAI therapy as second-line therapy after failure of ATD treatment between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed. Remission was defined as hypothyroid or euthyroid status without ATD, and with or without levothyroxine at 12 months after RAI therapy.
Results
The 1-year remission rate after 2nd RAI therapy (66%, 152/230) is significantly higher than that after 1st RAI therapy (48%, 393/815) or long-term ATD treatment after 1st RAI therapy failure (42%). The clinical response to 2nd RAI therapy was more rapid. The median time intervals from the 2nd RAI therapy to ATD discontinuation (1.3 months) and to the start of levothyroxine replacement (2.5 months) were significantly shorter than those for the 1st RAI therapy. A smaller goiter size, a longer time interval between the 1st and 2nd RAI therapies, and a longer ATD discontinuation period predicted remission after the 2nd RAI therapy. Finally, in 78 patients who failed the 2nd RAI therapy, the mean ATD dosage significantly reduced 5.1 mg over 12 months.
Conclusion
Repeated RAI therapy can be a good therapeutic option, especially in patients with smaller goiters and those who are more responsive to the 1st RAI therapy.

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  • Effect of liver dysfunction on outcome of radioactive iodine therapy for Graves’ disease
    Yuyang Ze, Fei Shao, Xuefeng Feng, Shanmei Shen, Yan Bi, Dalong Zhu, Xiaowen Zhang
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Thyroid
Comparison of Korean vs. American Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System in Malignancy Risk Assessment of Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules
Sunyoung Kang, Seul Ki Kwon, Hoon Sung Choi, Min Joo Kim, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park, Sun Wook Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1111-1120.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1208
  • 2,581 View
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  • 5 Citations
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Background
The management of cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules is challenging for clinicians. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of the Korean Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (K-TIRADS) with that of the American College of Radiology (ACR)-TIRADS for predicting the malignancy risk of indeterminate thyroid nodules.
Methods
Thyroid nodules diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) followed by surgery or core needle biopsy at a single referral hospital were enrolled.
Results
Among 200 thyroid nodules, 78 (39.0%) nodules were classified as indeterminate by FNA (Bethesda category III, IV, and V), and 114 (57.0%) nodules were finally diagnosed as malignancy by surgery or core needle biopsy. The area under the curve (AUC) was higher for FNA than for either TIRADS system in all nodules, while all three methods showed similar AUCs for indeterminate nodules. However, for Bethesda category III nodules, applying K-TIRADS 5 significantly increased the risk of malignancy compared to a cytological examination alone (50.0% vs. 26.5%, P=0.028), whereas applying ACR-TIRADS did not lead to a change.
Conclusion
K-TIRADS and ACR-TIRADS showed similar diagnostic performance in assessing indeterminate thyroid nodules, and K-TIRADS had beneficial effects for malignancy prediction in Bethesda category III nodules.

Citations

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  • Diagnostic Performance of Various Ultrasound Risk Stratification Systems for Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules: A Meta-Analysis
    Ji-Sun Kim, Byung Guk Kim, Gulnaz Stybayeva, Se Hwan Hwang
    Cancers.2023; 15(2): 424.     CrossRef
  • The impact of thyroid imaging reporting and data system on the management of Bethesda III thyroid nodules
    Saad M. Alqahtani, Saif S. Al-Sobhi, Mohammed A. Alturiqy, Riyadh I. Alsalloum, Hindi N. Al-Hindi
    Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences.2023; 18(3): 506.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic Performance of Six Ultrasound Risk Stratification Systems for Thyroid Nodules: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis
    Do Hyun Kim, Sung Won Kim, Mohammed Abdullah Basurrah, Jueun Lee, Se Hwan Hwang
    American Journal of Roentgenology.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic Performance of ACR and Kwak TI-RADS for Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules: An Update Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yun Jin Kang, Gulnaz Stybayeya, Ju Eun Lee, Se Hwan Hwang
    Cancers.2022; 14(23): 5961.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems in Malignancy Risk Stratification of Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules
    Bo Hyun Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(5): 974.     CrossRef
Endocrine Research
DEHP Down-Regulates Tshr Gene Expression in Rat Thyroid Tissues and FRTL-5 Rat Thyrocytes: A Potential Mechanism of Thyroid Disruption
Min Joo Kim, Hwan Hee Kim, Young Shin Song, Ok-Hee Kim, Kyungho Choi, Sujin Kim, Byung-Chul Oh, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(2):447-454.   Published online March 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.920
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  • 7 Citations
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Background
Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is known to disrupt thyroid hormonal status. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of this disruption is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the direct effects of DEHP on the thyroid gland.
Methods
DEHP (vehicle, 50 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats for 2 weeks. The expression of the thyroid hormone synthesis pathway in rat thyroid tissues was analyzed through RNA sequencing analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. DEHP was treated to FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, and an RT-PCR analysis was performed. A reporter gene assay containing the promoter of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in Nthy-ori 3-1 human thyroid cells was constructed, and luciferase activity was determined.
Results
After DEHP treatment, the free thyroxine (T4) and total T4 levels in rats significantly decreased. RNA sequencing analysis of rat thyroid tissues showed little difference between vehicle and DEHP groups. In the RT-PCR analysis, Tshr expression was significantly lower in both DEHP groups (50 and 500 mg/kg) compared to that in the vehicle group, and IHC staining showed that TSHR expression in the 50 mg/kg DEHP group significantly decreased. DEHP treatment to FRTL-5 cells significantly down-regulated Tshr expression. DEHP treatment also reduced luciferase activity in a reporter gene assay for TSHR.
Conclusion
Although overall genetic changes in the thyroid hormone synthesis pathway are not clear, DEHP exposure could significantly down-regulate Tshr expression in thyroid glands. Down-regulation of Tshr gene appears to be one of potential mechanisms of thyroid disruption by DEHP exposure.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intrauterine exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) disrupts the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of the F1 rats during adult life
    Érica Kássia Sousa-Vidal, Guilherme Henrique, Renata Elen Costa da Silva, Caroline Serrano-Nascimento
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and thyroid: biological mechanisms of interference and possible clinical implications
    Xueting Zhang, Wen Qi, Qi Xu, Xu Li, Liting Zhou, Lin Ye
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2022; 29(2): 1634.     CrossRef
  • The possible thyroid disruptive effect of di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate and the potential protective role of selenium and curcumin nanoparticles: a toxicological and histological study
    Naima Abd El-Halim Sherif, Asmaa El-Banna, Rehab Ahmed Abdel-Moneim, Zahraa Khalifa Sobh, Manal Ibrahim Fathy Balah
    Toxicology Research.2022; 11(1): 108.     CrossRef
  • Environmental disruption of reproductive rhythms
    Marie-Azélie Moralia, Clarisse Quignon, Marine Simonneaux, Valérie Simonneaux
    Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology.2022; 66: 100990.     CrossRef
  • Endocrine-disruptor endpoints in the ovary and thyroid of adult female rats exposed to realistic doses of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
    Amel Jebara, Asma Beltifa, Guissepa Di Bella, Lotfi Mabrouk, Hedi Ben Mansour
    Journal of Water and Health.2022; 20(8): 1256.     CrossRef
  • The influence of sunitinib and sorafenib, two tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on development and thyroid system in zebrafish larvae
    Gang Wei, Cao-xu Zhang, Yu Jing, Xia Chen, Huai-dong Song, Liu Yang
    Chemosphere.2022; 308: 136354.     CrossRef
  • Role of estrogen receptors in thyroid toxicity induced by mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate via endoplasmic reticulum stress: An in vitro mechanistic investigation
    Qi Xu, Liting Zhou, Hyonju Ri, Xu Li, Xueting Zhang, Wen Qi, Lin Ye
    Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology.2022; 96: 104007.     CrossRef
Clinical Study
Low Predictive Value of FRAX Adjusted by Trabecular Bone Score for Osteoporotic Fractures in Korean Women: A Community-Based Cohort Study
Hana Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Min Joo Kim, A Ram Hong, HyungJin Choi, EuJeong Ku, Ji Hyun Lee, Chan Soo Shin, Nam H. Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(2):359-366.   Published online June 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.35.2.359
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  • 8 Citations
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Background
The value of the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) and the trabecular bone score (TBS) for assessing osteoporotic fracture risk has not been fully elucidated in Koreans. We conducted this study to clarify the predictive value of FRAX adjusted by TBS for osteoporotic fractures in Korean women.
Methods
After screening 7,192 eligible subjects from the Ansung cohort, 1,165 women aged 45 to 76 years with available bone mineral density (BMD) and TBS data were enrolled in this study. We assessed their clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fractures and evaluated the predictive value of FRAX with or without BMD and TBS.
Results
During the mean follow-up period of 7.5 years, 99 (8.5%) women suffered major osteoporotic fractures (MOFs) and 28 (2.4%) experienced hip fractures. FRAX without BMD, BMD-adjusted FRAX, and TBS-adjusted FRAX were significantly associated with the risk of MOFs (hazard ratio [HR] per percent increase, 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 1.14; HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15; and HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.13, respectively). However, BMD-adjusted FRAX and TBS-adjusted FRAX did not predict MOFs better than FRAX without BMD based on the Harrell’s C statistic. FRAX probabilities showed limited value for predicting hip fractures. The cut-off values of FRAX without BMD, FRAX with BMD, and FRAX with BMD adjusted by TBS for predicting MOFs were 7.2%, 5.0%, and 6.7%, respectively.
Conclusion
FRAX with BMD and TBS adjustment did not show better predictive value for osteoporotic fractures in this study than FRAX without adjustment. Moreover, the cut-off values of FRAX probabilities for treatment might be lower in Korean women than in other countries.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of predictive value of FRAX, trabecular bone score, and bone mineral density for vertebral fractures in systemic sclerosis: A cross-sectional study
    Kyung-Ann Lee, Hyun-Joo Kim, Hyun-Sook Kim
    Medicine.2023; 102(2): e32580.     CrossRef
  • Screening for the primary prevention of fragility fractures among adults aged 40 years and older in primary care: systematic reviews of the effects and acceptability of screening and treatment, and the accuracy of risk prediction tools
    Michelle Gates, Jennifer Pillay, Megan Nuspl, Aireen Wingert, Ben Vandermeer, Lisa Hartling
    Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Chronic airway disease as a major risk factor for fractures in osteopenic women: Nationwide cohort study
    Sung Hye Kong, Ae Jeong Jo, Chan Mi Park, Kyun Ik Park, Ji Eun Yun, Jung Hee Kim
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of HU histogram analysis and BMD for proximal femoral fragility fracture assessment: a retrospective single-center case–control study
    Sun-Young Park, Hong Il Ha, Injae Lee, Hyun Kyung Lim
    European Radiology.2022; 32(3): 1448.     CrossRef
  • Association of Trabecular Bone Score-Adjusted Fracture Risk Assessment Tool with Coronary Artery Calcification in Women
    Tzyy-Ling Chuang, Yuh-Feng Wang, Malcolm Koo, Mei-Hua Chuang
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(1): 178.     CrossRef
  • Risk of osteoporotic fracture in women using the FRAX tool with and without bone mineral density score in patients followed at a tertiary outpatient clinic ‒ An observational study
    Maria Helena Sampaio Favarato, Maria Flora de Almeida, Arnaldo Lichtenstein, Milton de Arruda Martins, Mario Ferreira Junior
    Clinics.2022; 77: 100015.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Trabecular Bone Score–Adjusted Fracture Risk Assessment (TBS-FRAX) and FRAX Tools for Identification of High Fracture Risk among Taiwanese Adults Aged 50 to 90 Years with or without Prediabetes and Diabetes
    Tzyy-Ling Chuang, Mei-Hua Chuang, Yuh-Feng Wang, Malcolm Koo
    Medicina.2022; 58(12): 1766.     CrossRef
  • Application of the Trabecular Bone Score in Clinical Practice
    Sung Hye Kong, Namki Hong, Jin-Woo Kim, Deog Yoon Kim, Jung Hee Kim
    Journal of Bone Metabolism.2021; 28(2): 101.     CrossRef
Thyroid
Bisphenols and Thyroid Hormone
Min Joo Kim, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2019;34(4):340-348.   Published online December 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2019.34.4.340
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  • 48 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM

In recent decades, attention has been directed toward the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on human health. BPA has estrogenic activity and is regarded as a representative endocrine disruptor. In addition, mounting evidence indicates that BPA can disrupt thyroid hormone and its action. This review examined human epidemiological studies to investigate the association between BPA exposure and thyroid hormone levels, and analyzed in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify the causal relationship and its mechanism of action. BPA is involved in thyroid hormone action not only as a thyroid hormone receptor antagonist, but also through several other mechanisms. Since the use of bisphenols other than BPA has recently increased, we also reviewed the effects of other bisphenols on thyroid hormone action.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exposure to Bisphenol A, S, and F and its Association with Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus in General Adults of Korea: Korean National Environmental Health Survey (KoNEHS) 2015–2017
    Min Kyong Moon, Min Joo Kim, Inae Lee, Sunmi Kim, Sohyeon Choi, Jeongim Park, Yoon Hee Cho, Sooyeon Hong, Jiyoung Yoo, Hyunwoong Park, Gi Jeong Cheon, Young Joo Park, Kyungho Choi
    Exposure and Health.2023; 15(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Exposure to Bisphenol A increases malignancy risk of thyroid nodules in overweight/obese patients
    Vincenzo Marotta, Lucia Grumetto, Ilaria Neri, Giacomo Russo, Anna Tortora, Giulia Izzo, Ilaria Panariello, Domenico Rocco, Luciano Pezzullo, Mario Vitale
    Environmental Pollution.2023; 316: 120478.     CrossRef
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    Lei Zhang, Jiahuai Zhang, Sai Fan, Yuxin Zhong, Jingguang Li, Yunfeng Zhao, Song Ni, Jiaying Liu, Yongning Wu
    Chemosphere.2023; 312: 137162.     CrossRef
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    Sudipta Dutta, Sakhila K. Banu, Joe A. Arosh
    Reproductive Toxicology.2023; 115: 56.     CrossRef
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    Yongwei Guo, Wei Shi, Zhiwei Liu, Xian Sun, Jiaxue Wu, Yuping Wu
    Environment International.2023; 171: 107679.     CrossRef
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    Connor C. McGuire, Jacques R. Robert
    Developmental & Comparative Immunology.2023; 140: 104617.     CrossRef
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    Pieter Vancamp, Lucile Butruille, Anni Herranen, Anita Boelen, Jean-Baptiste Fini, Barbara A. Demeneix, Sylvie Remaud
    Environment International.2023; 172: 107770.     CrossRef
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    Szymon Szubartowski, Tomasz Tuzimski
    Molecules.2023; 28(3): 1432.     CrossRef
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    Myungsil Hwang, Seon-Joo Park, Hae-Jeung Lee
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(6): 3587.     CrossRef
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    Ylenia Della Rocca, Enrico Matteo Traini, Francesca Diomede, Luigia Fonticoli, Oriana Trubiani, Alessia Paganelli, Jacopo Pizzicannella, Guya Diletta Marconi
    Pharmaceutics.2023; 15(3): 908.     CrossRef
  • The associations between concentrations of gestational bisphenol analogues and thyroid related hormones in cord blood: A prospective cohort study
    Jianya Xi, Xiujuan Su, Ziliang Wang, Honglei Ji, Yao Chen, Xiaofang Liu, Maohua Miao, Hong Liang, Wei Yuan
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.2023; 256: 114838.     CrossRef
  • Structural binding perspectives of common plasticizers and a flame retardant, BDE‐153, against thyroxine‐binding globulin: potential for endocrine disruption
    Ishfaq Ahmad Sheikh, Mohd Amin Beg
    Journal of Applied Toxicology.2022; 42(5): 841.     CrossRef
  • New insights on the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on children
    Barbara Predieri, Crésio A.D. Alves, Lorenzo Iughetti
    Jornal de Pediatria.2022; 98: S73.     CrossRef
  • Toxic Metal Concentrations in Drinking Water and Possible Effect on Sex Hormones among Men in Sabongida-Ora, Edo State, Nigeria
    Osaro Ogie Enehizena, Mathias A. Emokpae
    Medicines.2022; 9(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenols impact hormone levels in animals: A meta-analysis
    Alexander M. Rubin, Frank Seebacher
    Science of The Total Environment.2022; 828: 154533.     CrossRef
  • The effects of prenatal and lactational bisphenol A and/or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure on female reproductive system
    Gizem Ozkemahli, Aylin Balci Ozyurt, Pinar Erkekoglu, Naciye Dilara Zeybek, Nilgun Yersal, Belma Kocer-Gumusel
    Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.2022; 32(8): 597.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Phthalate Metabolites and Bisphenol A Levels with Obesity in Children: The Korean National Environmental Health Survey (KoNEHS) 2015 to 2017
    Moon Young Seo, Shinje Moon, Shin-Hye Kim, Mi Jung Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(2): 249.     CrossRef
  • Associations of bisphenol exposure with thyroid hormones in pregnant women: a prospective birth cohort study in China
    Huishen Huang, Jun Liang, Peng Tang, Chuanxiang Yu, Haoran Fan, Qian Liao, Jinghua Long, Dongxiang Pan, Xiaoyun Zeng, Shun Liu, Dongping Huang, Xiaoqiang Qiu
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2022; 29(58): 87170.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenols A, F, S and AF trigger apoptosis and/or endoplasmic reticulum stress in human endometrial stromal cells
    Ricardo Ferreira, Cristina Amaral, Georgina Correia-da-Silva, Marta Almada, Margarida Borges, Sara Cristina Cunha, José Oliveira Fernandes, Natércia Teixeira
    Toxicology.2022; 478: 153282.     CrossRef
  • Association between phenols and thyroid hormones: The role of iodothyronine deiodinase genes
    Blanca Sarzo, Reem Abumallouh, Natalia Marín, Sabrina Llop, Andrea Beneito, Inmaculada Lopez-Flores, Nerea Ferrero, Amrit Kaur Sakhi, Ferran Ballester, Maria-Jose Lopez-Espinosa
    Environmental Pollution.2022; 311: 119926.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenol A as a Factor in the Mosaic of Autoimmunity
    Zora Lazurova, Ivica Lazurova, Yehuda Shoenfeld
    Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders - Drug Targets.2022; 22(7): 728.     CrossRef
  • Zebrafish as an emerging tool for drug discovery and development for thyroid diseases
    Poonam Yadav, Lopmudra P. Sarode, Ravinder Reddy Gaddam, Puneet Kumar, Jasvinder Singh Bhatti, Amit Khurana, Umashanker Navik
    Fish & Shellfish Immunology.2022; 130: 53.     CrossRef
  • Review of in silico studies dedicated to the nuclear receptor family: Therapeutic prospects and toxicological concerns
    Asma Sellami, Manon Réau, Matthieu Montes, Nathalie Lagarde
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Use of high-resolution metabolomics to assess the biological perturbations associated with maternal exposure to Bisphenol A and Bisphenol F among pregnant African American women
    Rachel Tchen, Youran Tan, Dana Boyd Barr, P. Barry Ryan, ViLinh Tran, Zhenjiang Li, Yi-Juan Hu, Alicia K. Smith, Dean P. Jones, Anne L. Dunlop, Donghai Liang
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  • Effects of bisphenol A on pancreas and thyroid gland of young and adult female Sprague Dawlеy rats
    D. Yahia, H. Hamdy, D. A. Salem, S. Afifi
    BULGARIAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE.2022; 25(3): 426.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenol A analogues induce a feed-forward estrogenic response in zebrafish
    Silvia Karim, Ruixin Hao, Caroline Pinto, Jan-Åke Gustafsson, Marina Grimaldi, Patrick Balaguer, Maria Bondesson
    Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.2022; 455: 116263.     CrossRef
  • Mediterranean Diet and Thyroid: An Interesting Alliance
    Giuseppe Bellastella, Lorenzo Scappaticcio, Francesco Caiazzo, Maria Tomasuolo, Raffaela Carotenuto, Mariangela Caputo, Stefania Arena, Paola Caruso, Maria Ida Maiorino, Katherine Esposito
    Nutrients.2022; 14(19): 4130.     CrossRef
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    Barbara Predieri, Lorenzo Iughetti, Sergio Bernasconi, Maria Elisabeth Street
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(19): 11899.     CrossRef
  • Single and repeated bisphenol A treatment induces ROS, Aβ and hyperphosphorylated-tau accumulation, and insulin pathways disruption, through HDAC2 and PTP1B overexpression, leading to SN56 cholinergic apoptotic cell death
    Andrea Flores, Paula Moyano, Emma Sola, José Manuel García, Jimena García, María José Anadon, María Teresa Frejo, Maria Victoria Naval, Maria de la Cabeza Fernadez, Javier del Pino
    Food and Chemical Toxicology.2022; 170: 113500.     CrossRef
  • Application of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Combined with Fluorescence Detector and Dispersive Liquid–Liquid Microextraction to Quantification of Selected Bisphenols in Human Amniotic Fluid Samples
    Szymon Szubartowski, Tomasz Tuzimski
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 297.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenols emerging in Norwegian and Czech aquatic environments show transthyretin binding potency and other less-studied endocrine-disrupting activities
    Pavel Šauer, Helena Švecová, Kateřina Grabicová, Farah Gönül Aydın, Tomáš Mackuľak, Vít Kodeš, Line Diana Blytt, Liv Bruås Henninge, Roman Grabic, Hana Kocour Kroupová
    Science of The Total Environment.2021; 751: 141801.     CrossRef
  • Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Thyroid Cancer: An Overview
    Mathilda Alsen, Catherine Sinclair, Peter Cooke, Kimia Ziadkhanpour, Eric Genden, Maaike van Gerwen
    Toxics.2021; 9(1): 14.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid-Modulating Activities of Olive and Its Polyphenols: A Systematic Review
    Kok-Lun Pang, Johanna Nathania Lumintang, Kok-Yong Chin
    Nutrients.2021; 13(2): 529.     CrossRef
  • Human biomonitoring of bisphenol A along pregnancy: An exposure reconstruction of the EXHES-Spain cohort
    María Ángeles Martínez, Neus González, Anna Martí, Montse Marquès, Joaquim Rovira, Vikas Kumar, Martí Nadal
    Environmental Research.2021; 196: 110941.     CrossRef
  • Dietary Intake of Endocrine Disrupting Substances Presents in Environment and Their Impact on Thyroid Function
    Aneta Sokal, Sara Jarmakiewicz-Czaja, Jacek Tabarkiewicz, Rafał Filip
    Nutrients.2021; 13(3): 867.     CrossRef
  • BPA and BPA alternatives BPS, BPAF, and TMBPF, induce cytotoxicity and apoptosis in rat and human stem cells
    Kristen G. Harnett, Ashley Chin, Sonya M. Schuh
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.2021; 216: 112210.     CrossRef
  • Bisphenols and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes: The Role of the Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Tissue
    Fozia Ahmed, Maria João Pereira, Céline Aguer
    Environments.2021; 8(4): 35.     CrossRef
  • Involvement of Thyroid Hormones in Brain Development and Cancer
    Gabriella Schiera, Carlo Maria Di Liegro, Italia Di Liegro
    Cancers.2021; 13(11): 2693.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Factors Affecting Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Thyroid Hormone Levels
    Mirjana Babić Leko, Ivana Gunjača, Nikolina Pleić, Tatijana Zemunik
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(12): 6521.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid health in big city realities
    Liudmila L. Kamynina
    City Healthcare.2021; 2(2): 84.     CrossRef
  • Adverse effects of bisphenol B exposure on the thyroid and nervous system in early life stages of zebrafish
    Qian Yang, Zhenzhu Zhu, Qin Liu, Lihong Chen
    Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology.2021; 250: 109167.     CrossRef
  • Teratogenicity and toxicity of the new BPA alternative TMBPF, and BPA, BPS, and BPAF in chick embryonic development
    Kristen G. Harnett, Lucy G. Moore, Ashley Chin, Isabel C. Cohen, Rylee R. Lautrup, Sonya M. Schuh
    Current Research in Toxicology.2021; 2: 399.     CrossRef
  • Thyroxine-binding globulin, peripheral deiodinase activity, and thyroid autoantibody status in association of phthalates and phenolic compounds with thyroid hormones in adult population
    Sohyeon Choi, Min Joo Kim, Young Joo Park, Sunmi Kim, Kyungho Choi, Gi Jeong Cheon, Yoon Hee Cho, Hye Li Jeon, Jiyoung Yoo, Jeongim Park
    Environment International.2020; 140: 105783.     CrossRef
  • Clinical expression of endocrine disruptors in children
    Lorenzo Iughetti, Laura Lucaccioni, Maria E. Street, Sergio Bernasconi
    Current Opinion in Pediatrics.2020; 32(4): 554.     CrossRef
  • Combined effects of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and bisphenol A on thyroid hormone homeostasis in adolescent female rats
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Clinical Study
Postoperative Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Levels Did Not Affect Recurrence after Thyroid Lobectomy in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer
Myung-Chul Lee, Min Joo Kim, Hoon Sung Choi, Sun Wook Cho, Guk Haeng Lee, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2019;34(2):150-157.   Published online May 10, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2019.34.2.150
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Background

Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppression is recommended for patients who undergo thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). However, the impact of TSH suppression on clinical outcomes in low-risk DTC remains uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the effects of postoperative TSH levels on recurrence in patients with low-risk DTC after thyroid lobectomy.

Methods

Patients (n=1,528) who underwent thyroid lobectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma between 2000 and 2012 were included in this study. According to the mean and dominant TSH values during the entire follow-up period or 5 years, patients were divided into four groups (<0.5, 0.5 to 1.9, 2.0 to 4.4, and ≥4.5 mIU/L). Recurrence-free survival was compared among the groups.

Results

During the 5.6 years of follow-up, 21 patients (1.4%) experienced recurrence. Mean TSH levels were within the recommended low-normal range (0.5 to 1.9 mIU/L) during the total follow-up period or 5 years in 38.1% or 36.0% of patients. The mean and dominant TSH values did not affect recurrence-free survival. Adjustment for other risk factors did not alter the results.

Conclusion

Serum TSH levels did not affect short-term recurrence in patients with low-risk DTC after thyroid lobectomy. TSH suppression should be conducted more selectively.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outcomes and Trends of Treatments in High‐Risk Differentiated Thyroid Cancer
    Arash Abiri, Khodayar Goshtasbi, Sina J. Torabi, Edward C. Kuan, William B. Armstrong, Tjoson Tjoa, Yarah M. Haidar
    Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.2023; 168(4): 745.     CrossRef
  • Optimal Serum Thyrotropin Level for Patients with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma After Lobectomy
    Siyuan Xu, Ying Huang, Hui Huang, Xiaohang Zhang, Jiaxin Qian, Xiaolei Wang, Zhengang Xu, Shaoyan Liu, Jie Liu
    Thyroid.2022; 32(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • Optimal Thyrotropin Following Lobectomy for Papillary Thyroid Cancer: Does It Exist?
    Lindsay Bischoff, Megan R. Haymart
    Thyroid.2022; 32(2): 117.     CrossRef
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    Guoliang Zhang, Bing Li, Yuanmei Lin
    Frontiers in Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Question of an Optimal TSH Goal After Lobectomy for Papillary Thyroid Cancer
    Bernadette Biondi
    Clinical Thyroidology.2022; 34(2): 67.     CrossRef
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    Ho-Ryun Won, Eonju Jeon, Jae Won Chang, Yea Eun Kang, Kunho Song, Sun Wook Kim, Dong Mee Lim, Tae Kwun Ha, Ki-Wook Chung, Hyo-Jeong Kim, Young Joo Park, Bon Seok Koo
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    Yi Dou, Yingji Chen, Daixing Hu, Xinliang Su
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    Jin Gu Kang, Jung Eun Choi, Soo Jung Lee, Su Hwan Kang
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Miscellaneous
Corrigendum: Author's Name Correction. Study Protocol of Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study of Active Surveillance on Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma (MAeSTro)
Jae Hoon Moon, Ji-hoon Kim, Eun Kyung Lee, Kyu Eun Lee, Sung Hye Kong, Yeo Koon Kim, Woo-Jin Jeong, Chang Yoon Lee, Roh-Eul Yoo, Yul Hwangbo, Young Shin Song, Min Joo Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Su-jin Kim, Eun-Jae Chung, June Young Choi, Chang Hwan Ryu, You Jin Lee, Jeong Hun Hah, Yuh-Seog Jung, Junsun Ryu, Yunji Hwang, Sue K. Park, Ho Kyung Sung, Ka Hee Yi, Do Joon Park, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2018;33(3):427-427.   Published online August 14, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2018.33.3.427
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  • Invasiveness and Metastatic Aggressiveness in Small Differentiated Thyroid Cancers: Demography of Small Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas in the Swedish Population
    Haytham Bayadsi, Martin Bergman, Malin Sund, Joakim Hennings
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    Ling Zhao, Xiaoya Sun, Yukun Luo, Fulin Wang, Zhaohui Lyu
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Thyroid
Star-Shaped Intense Uptake of 131I on Whole Body Scans Can Reflect Good Therapeutic Effects of Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Treatment of 1.1 GBq
Sung Hye Kong, Jung Ah Lim, Young Shin Song, Shinje Moon, Ye An Kim, Min Joo Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Jae Hoon Moon, Ka Hee Yi, Do Joon Park, Bo Youn Cho, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2018;33(2):228-235.   Published online May 4, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2018.33.2.228
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Background

After initial radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment in differentiated thyroid cancer patients, we sometimes observe a star-shaped region of intense uptake of 131I on whole body scans (WBSs), called a ‘star artifact.’ We evaluated the clinical implications of star artifacts on the success rate of remnant ablation and long-term prognosis.

Methods

Total 636 patients who received 131I dose of 1.1 GBq for the initial RAI therapy and who did not show distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis were retrospectively evaluated. A negative second WBS was used for evaluating the ablation efficacy of the RAI therapy. Among them, 235 patients (36.9%) showed a star artifact on their first WBS.

Results

In patients with first stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) levels ≤2 ng/mL, patients with star artifacts had a higher rate of negative second WBS compared with those without star artifacts (77.8% vs. 63.9%, P=0.044), and showed significantly higher recurrence-free survival (P=0.043) during the median 8.0 years (range, 1.0 to 10.0) of follow-up. The 5- and 10-year recurrence rates (5YRR, 10YRR) were also significantly lower in patients with star artifacts compared with those without (0% vs. 4.9%, respectively, P=0.006 for 5YRR; 0% vs. 6.4%, respectively, P=0.005 for 10YRR). However, ablation success rate or recurrence-free survival was not different among patients whose first sTg levels >2 ng/mL regardless of star artifacts.

Conclusion

Therefore, star artifacts at initial RAI therapy imply a good ablation efficacy or a favorable long-term prognosis in patients with sTg levels ≤2 ng/mL.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prognostic value of star-shaped intense uptake of 131I in thyroid cancer patients
    Liu Xiao, Wen Jie Zhang, Yue Qi Wang, Lin Li
    Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular (English Edition).2021; 40(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • Valores pronósticos de la captación en estrella de 131I en pacientes con cáncer diferenciado de tiroides
    L. Xiao, W.J. Zhang, Y.Q. Wang, L. Li
    Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular.2021; 40(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • Comparison between planar and single-photon computed tomography images for radiation intensity quantification in iodine-131 scintigraphy
    Yusuke Iizuka, Tomohiro Katagiri, Minoru Inoue, Kiyonao Nakamura, Takashi Mizowaki
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Thyroid
Study Protocol of Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study of Active Surveillance on Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma (MAeSTro)
Jae Hoon Moon, Ji-hoon Kim, Eun Kyung Lee, Kyu Eun Lee, Sung Hye Kong, Yeo Koon Kim, Woo-jin Jung, Chang Yoon Lee, Roh-Eul Yoo, Yul Hwangbo, Young Shin Song, Min Joo Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Su-jin Kim, Eun Jae Jung, June Young Choi, Chang Hwan Ryu, You Jin Lee, Jeong Hun Hah, Yuh-Seog Jung, Junsun Ryu, Yunji Hwang, Sue K. Park, Ho Kyung Sung, Ka Hee Yi, Do Joon Park, Young Joo Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2018;33(2):278-286.   Published online June 21, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2018.33.2.278
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  • 25 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Background

The ongoing Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study of Active Surveillance on Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma (MAeSTro) aims to observe the natural course of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC), develop a protocol for active surveillance (AS), and compare the long-term prognosis, quality of life, and medical costs between the AS and immediate surgery groups.

Methods

This multicenter prospective cohort study of PTMC started in June 2016. The inclusion criteria were suspicious of malignancy or malignancy based on fine needle aspiration or core needle biopsy, age of ≥18 years, and a maximum diameter of ≤1 cm. If there was no major organ involvement, no lymph node/distant metastasis, and no variants with poor prognosis, the patients were explained of the pros and cons of immediate surgery and AS before selecting AS or immediate surgery. Follow-up visits (physical examination, ultrasonography, thyroid function, and questionnaires) are scheduled every 6 months during the first 2 years, and then every 1 year thereafter. Progression was defined as a maximum diameter increase of ≥3, ≥2 mm in two dimensions, suspected organ involvement, or lymph node/distant metastasis.

Results

Among 439 enrolled patients, 290 patients (66.1%) chose AS and 149 patients (33.9%) chose immediate surgery. The median follow-up was 6.7 months (range, 0.2 to 11.9). The immediate surgery group had a larger maximum tumor diameter, compared to the AS group (7.1±1.9 mm vs. 6.6±2.0 mm, respectively; P=0.014).

Conclusion

The results will be useful for developing an appropriate PTMC treatment policy based on its natural course and risk factors for progression.

Citations

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Obesity and Metabolism
Mitochondrial Complexes I and II Are More Susceptible to Autophagy Deficiency in Mouse β-Cells
Min Joo Kim, Ok Kyong Choi, Kyung Sil Chae, Min Kyeong Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Masaaki Komatsu, Keiji Tanaka, Hakmo Lee, Sung Soo Chung, Soo Heon Kwak, Young Min Cho, Kyong Soo Park, Hye Seung Jung
Endocrinol Metab. 2015;30(1):65-70.   Published online March 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2015.30.1.65
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Background

Damaged mitochondria are removed by autophagy. Therefore, impairment of autophagy induces the accumulation of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction in most mammalian cells. Here, we investigated mitochondrial function and the expression of mitochondrial complexes in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7)-deficient β-cells.

Methods

To evaluate the effect of autophagy deficiency on mitochondrial function in pancreatic β-cells, we isolated islets from Atg7F/F:RIP-Cre+ mice and wild-type littermates. Oxygen consumption rate and intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) content were measured. The expression of mitochondrial complex genes in Atg7-deficient islets and in β-TC6 cells transfected with siAtg7 was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results

Baseline oxygen consumption rate of Atg7-deficient islets was significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05). Intracellular ATP content of Atg7-deficient islets during glucose stimulation was also significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05). By Oxygraph-2k analysis, mitochondrial respiration in Atg7-deficient islets was significantly decreased overall, although state 3 respiration and responses to antimycin A were unaffected. The mRNA levels of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V in Atg7-deficient islets were significantly lower than in control islets (P<0.05). Down-regulation of Atg7 in β-TC6 cells also reduced the expression of complexes I and II, with marginal significance (P<0.1).

Conclusion

Impairment of autophagy in pancreatic β-cells suppressed the expression of some mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Among the complexes, I and II seem to be most vulnerable to autophagy deficiency.

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Preoperative Localization and Intraoperative Parathyroid Hormone Assay in Korean Patients with Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Eirie Cho, Jung Mi Chang, Seok Young Yoon, Gil Tae Lee, Yun Hyi Ku, Hong Il Kim, Myung-Chul Lee, Guk Haeng Lee, Min Joo Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2014;29(4):464-469.   Published online December 29, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2014.29.4.464
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Background

The intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) assay is widely used in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). We investigated the usefulness of the IOPTH assay in Korean patients with PHPT.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the data of 33 patients with PHPT who underwent parathyroidectomy. Neck ultrasonography (US) and 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy (MIBI scan) were performed preoperatively and IOPTH assays were conducted.

Results

The sensitivity of neck US and MIBI scans were 91% and 94%, respectively. A 50% decrease in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels 10 minutes after excision of the parathyroid gland was obtained in 91% (30/33) of patients and operative success was achieved in 97% (32/33) of patients. The IOPTH assay was 91% true-positive, 3% true-negative, 0% false-positive, and 6% false-negative. The overall accuracy of the IOPTH assay was 94%. In five cases with discordant neck US and MIBI scan results, a sufficient decrease in IOPTH levels helped the surgeon confirm the complete excision of the parathyroid gland with no additional neck exploration.

Conclusion

The IOPTH assay is an accurate tool for localizing hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands and is helpful for evaluating cases with discordant neck US and MIBI scan results.

Citations

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  • Single-Center Experience of Parathyroidectomy Using Intraoperative Parathyroid Hormone Monitoring
    Seong Hoon Kim, Si Yeon Lee, Eun Ah Min, Young Mi Hwang, Yun Suk Choi, Jin Wook Yi
    Medicina.2022; 58(10): 1464.     CrossRef
  • The natural history and hip geometric changes of primary hyperparathyroidism without parathyroid surgery
    Kyong Yeun Jung, A. Ram Hong, Dong Hwa Lee, Jung Hee Kim, Kyoung Min Kim, Chan Soo Shin, Seong Yeon Kim, Sang Wan Kim
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism.2017; 35(3): 278.     CrossRef
  • The utility of the radionuclide probe in parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism
    MS Lim, M Jinih, CH Ngai, NM Foley, HP Redmond
    The Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England.2017; 99(5): 369.     CrossRef
  • Articles in 'Endocrinology and Metabolism' in 2014
    Won-Young Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2015; 30(1): 47.     CrossRef
Thyroid
Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma with Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome
Hong Seok Choi, Min Joo Kim, Chae Ho Moon, Jong Ho Yoon, Ha Ra Ku, Geon Wook Kang, Im Il Na, Seung-Sook Lee, Byung-Chul Lee, Young Joo Park, Hong Il Kim, Yun Hyi Ku
Endocrinol Metab. 2014;29(1):96-100.   Published online March 14, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2014.29.1.96
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Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is caused most frequently by a bronchial carcinoid tumor or by small cell lung cancer. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare etiology of ectopic ACTH syndrome. We describe a case of Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH production from MTC in a 48-year-old male. He was diagnosed with MTC 14 years ago and underwent total thyroidectomy, cervical lymph node dissection and a series of metastasectomies. MTC was confirmed by the pathological examination of the thyroid and metastatic mediastinal lymph node tissues. Two years after his last surgery, he developed Cushingoid features, such as moon face and central obesity, accompanied by uncontrolled hypertension and new-onset diabetes. The laboratory results were compatible with ectopic ACTH syndrome. A bilateral adrenalectomy improved the clinical and laboratory findings that were associated with Cushing syndrome. This is the first confirmed case of ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by MTC in Korea.

Citations

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  • Medullary Thyroid Cancer with Ectopic Cushing's Syndrome: A Case Report and Systematic Review of Detailed Cases from the Literature
    Andrea Corsello, Vittoria Ramunno, Pietro Locantore, Giovanni Pacini, Esther Diana Rossi, Francesco Torino, Alfredo Pontecorvi, Carmela De Crea, Rosa Maria Paragliola, Marco Raffaelli, Salvatore Maria Corsello
    Thyroid.2022; 32(11): 1281.     CrossRef
  • Mucosal Neuroma Cues for Endocrine Emergency Treatment
    Gyu Gang Choi, Hwan Jin Lee, Hyo Jin Han, Young Beom Jeong, Heung Bum Lee, Ji Hyun Park
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(6): 1312.     CrossRef
  • Articles in 'Endocrinology and Metabolism' in 2014
    Won-Young Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2015; 30(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Rapid response of hypercortisolism to vandetanib treatment in a patient with advanced medullary thyroid cancer and ectopic Cushing syndrome
    Fabián Pitoia, Fernanda Bueno, Angélica Schmidt, Sabrina Lucas, Graciela Cross
    Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism.2015; 59(4): 343.     CrossRef
Characterization of Incidentally Detected Adrenal Pheochromocytoma.
Ye An Kim, Yul Hwangbo, Min Joo Kim, Hyung Jin Choi, Je Hyun Seo, Yenna Lee, Soo Heun Kwak, Eu Jeong Ku, Tae Jung Oh, Eun Roh, Jae Hyun Bae, Jung Hee Kim, Kyoung Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2012;27(2):132-137.   Published online June 20, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2012.27.2.132
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
In approach to an adrenal incidentaloma, early exclusion of pheochromocytoma is clinically important, due to the risk of catecholamine crisis. The aims of this study are to investigate the characteristics of incidentally detected pheochromocytomas, compared with that of the other adrenal incidentalomas, and to compare these characteristics with those of symptomatic pheochromocytomas. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of 198 patients with adrenal incidentaloma from 2001 to 2010. We analyzed the clinical, laboratory and radiological data of pheochromocytomas, in comparison with those of the other adrenal incidentalomas. We also compared the characteristics of these incidentally detected pheochromocytomas with the medical records of 28 pathologically proven pheochromocytomas, diagnosed based on typical symptoms. RESULTS: Among the 198 patients with adrenal incidentaloma, nineteen patients were diagnosed with pheochromocytoma. Pheochromocytomas showed larger size and higher Hounsfield unit at precontrast computed tomography (CT) than did non-pheochromocytomas. All pheochromocytomas were larger than 2.0 cm, and the Hounsfield units were 19 or higher in precontrast CT. When both criteria of size > 2.0 cm and Hounsfield unit > 19 were met, the sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma were 100% and 79.3%, respectively. Compared with patients with pheochromocytoma, diagnosed based on typical symptoms, patients with incidentally detected pheochromocytoma were older, presented less often with hypertension, and showed lower levels of 24-hour urine metanephrine. CONCLUSION: Adrenal incidentaloma with < 2.0 cm in size or < or = 19 Hounsfield units in precontrast CT imaging was less likely to be a pheochromocytoma. Patients with incidentally discovered pheochromocytoma showed lower catecholamine metabolites, compared with those patients with symptomatic pheochromocytoma.

Citations

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  • Guidelines for the Management of Adrenal Incidentaloma: the Korean Endocrine Society, Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines
    Jung-Min Lee, Mee Kyoung Kim, Seung-Hyun Ko, Jung-Min Koh, Bo-Yeon Kim, Sang-Wan Kim, Soo-Kyung Kim, Hae-Jin Kim, Ohk-Hyun Ryu, Juri Park, Jung-Soo Lim, Seong Yeon Kim, Young Kee Shong, Soon Jib Yoo
    The Korean Journal of Medicine.2017; 92(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adrenal Incidentaloma
    Jung-Min Lee, Mee Kyoung Kim, Seung-Hyun Ko, Jung-Min Koh, Bo-Yeon Kim, Sang Wan Kim, Soo-Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Ohk-Hyun Ryu, Juri Park, Jung Soo Lim, Seong Yeon Kim, Young Kee Shong, Soon Jib Yoo
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2017; 32(2): 200.     CrossRef
  • Characterization of Incidentally Detected Adrenal Pheochromocytoma
    Soon Jib Yoo, Woohyeon Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2012; 27(2): 116.     CrossRef
A Case Report of Bilateral Adrenocortical Carcinoma Complicated by Adrenal Insufficiency.
Min Joo Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Tae Young Kim, Sang Wan Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2011;26(3):243-247.   Published online September 1, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2011.26.3.243
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Adrenocortical carcinoma is often functional and presents with signs and symptoms of adrenal steroid hormone excess. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to bilateral adrenocortical carcinoma is a particularly rare complication. We recently encountered a case of bilateral adrenocortical carcinoma complicated by adrenal insufficiency. A 52-year-old male was transferred to this hospital complaining of general weakness and weight loss. A bilateral adrenal mass was detected on abdomen CT. Plasma cortisol and aldosterone failed to rise during the rapid ACTH stimulation test. The CT-guided adrenal biopsy revealed findings consistent with adrenocortical carcinoma. Left hemiparesis was developed and brain metastasis was detected via brain MRI. Despite the application of gamma knife surgery and chemotherapy, the disease progressed and the patient died.

Citations

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  • Bilateral Adrenocortical Carcinoma Presenting as Acute Adrenal Insufficiency
    Anshita Aggarwal, Aprajita Verma, Aparajita Roy, Bindu Kulshreshtha
    European Endocrinology.2020; 16(2): 172.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Bilateral ACTH-independent Adrenal Adenomas with Cushing's Syndrome Treated by Ipsilateral Total and Contralateral Partial Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy
    Seung Ah Park, Dong min Jung, Soon young Kim, Nan Young Choi, Tae-jun Kim, Yong kyun Kim, Seong kyun Na, Chul Sik Kim, Seong Jin Lee, Sung-Hee Ihm, Jun Goo Kang
    The Korean Journal of Obesity.2013; 22(4): 254.     CrossRef
Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Polymorphism and Effect of Testosterone Therapy in Hypogonadal Men in Korea.
Min Joo Kim, Jin Taek Kim, Sun Wook Cho, Sang Wan Kim, Chan Soo Shin, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2011;26(3):225-231.   Published online September 1, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2011.26.3.225
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
As the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene increases, transcriptional activities decrease and the effects of testosterone decline. In this study, we evaluated the importance of the CAG repeat polymorphism in regard to the effect/safety of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal Korean men. METHODS: The number of CAG repeats was determined in 42 hypogonadal men who underwent testosterone therapy for more than 24 months between December 1999 and August 2007. Body mass index, lean body mass, body fat, bone mineral density, type I collagen N-telopeptide (NTx), osteocalcin, lipid profile, hematocrit and PSA levels prior to and after 24 months of testosterone therapy were identified in our medical record review. RESULTS: Twenty-four months of testosterone therapy increased lean body mass, hematocrit, and PSA levels and reduced body fat, NTx, and HDL cholesterol levels. The mean number of CAG repeats in the AR gene was 23 +/- 3 (range, 15-29) in hypogonadal Korean men. The number of CAG repeats was not found to be associated with changes in lean body mass, body fat, NTx, HDL cholesterol, hematocrit, or PSA levels during testosterone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: No association between the number of CAG repeats in the AR gene and the effect/safety of testosterone therapy was detected in hypogonadal Korean men.

Citations

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  • Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length as a Risk Factor of Late-Onset Hypogonadism in a Korean Male Population
    Jong Wook Kim, Young Dae Bae, Sun Tae Ahn, Jin Wook Kim, Je Jong Kim, Du Geon Moon
    Sexual Medicine.2018; 6(3): 203.     CrossRef
  • Positive Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Metabolic Syndrome in a Korean Male Population
    Jong Wook Kim, Young Dae Bae, Sun Tae Ahn, Jin Wook Kim, Je Jong Kim, Du Geon Moon
    The World Journal of Men's Health.2018; 36(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Genome-Based Approaches in Endocrinology and Metabolism: From Clinical and Research Aspects
    Sihoon Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2011; 26(3): 208.     CrossRef
Pituitary Apoplexy in Korea - Characteristics, Treatment Options and Outcomes.
Jung Ah Lim, Jin Taek Kim, Min Joo Kim, Tae Hyuk Kim, Yenna Lee, Hwa Young Cho, Chan Soo Shin, Kyong Soo Park, Hak Chul Jang, Bo Youn Cho, Hong Kyu Lee, Seong Yeon Kim
J Korean Endocr Soc. 2009;24(4):247-253.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/jkes.2009.24.4.247
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Reports on pituitary apoplexy in Korea are limited. There are two treatment options for pituitary apoplexy - surgical decompression and conservative management. In this study, we examined clinical presentation and outcomes following different therapies in Korean patients with pituitary apoplexy. METHODS: Clinical data and treatment outcomes from 52 patients with pituitary apoplexy who visited Seoul National University Hospital between January 1992 and June 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to management options (a surgery group vs. a conservative management group) and their outcomes were compared. For patients who underwent surgery due to neurological symptoms, outcomes were compared between early and late surgery groups. RESULTS: Headache (73.1%) was the most common presenting symptom, and more than half of the patients were reported to have visual symptoms. The most common type of pathology was a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (67.3%). Nine patients received conservative management and 43 underwent surgical decompression. Their recovery from neurological and endocrinological abnormalities were similar. Among patients who showed neurological symptoms, 9 underwent surgery within 1 week of symptom onset and 24 underwent surgery after 1 week. There was no significant difference between outcomes of early and late surgery groups except recovery from impaired visual deficit was greater in the late surgery group. CONCLUSION: Patients with pituitary apoplexy in Korea show similar clinical features as similar patients in other countries. In our study, there was no significant difference between clinical outcomes of the surgery group and the conservative treatment group.

Citations

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  • The Outcomes of Pituitary Apoplexy with Conservative Treatment: Experiences at a Single Institution
    Youngbeom Seo, Yong Hwy Kim, Yun-Sik Dho, Jung Hee Kim, Jin Wook Kim, Chul-Kee Park, Dong Gyu Kim
    World Neurosurgery.2018; 115: e703.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Treatment Options of Pituitary Apoplexy
    Dong-Sun Kim
    Journal of Korean Endocrine Society.2009; 24(4): 237.     CrossRef

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