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Kwanhoon Jo  (Jo K) 3 Articles
Thyroid
The Early Changes in Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin Bioassay over Anti-Thyroid Drug Treatment Could Predict Prognosis of Graves’ Disease
Jin Yu, Han-Sang Baek, Chaiho Jeong, Kwanhoon Jo, Jeongmin Lee, Jeonghoon Ha, Min Hee Kim, Jungmin Lee, Dong-Jun Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(3):338-346.   Published online June 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1664
  • 2,167 View
  • 108 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
To determine whether baseline thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) bioassay or its early response upon treatment with an anti-thyroid drug (ATD) can predict prognosis of Graves’ disease (GD) in real-world practice.
Methods
This retrospective study enrolled GD patients who had previous ATD treatment with TSI bioassay checked at baseline and at follow-up from April 2010 to November 2019 in one referral hospital. The study population were divided into two groups: patients who experienced relapse or continued ATD (relapse/persistence), and patients who experienced no relapse after ATD discontinuation (remission). The slope and area under the curve at 1st year (AUC1yr) of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies including TSI bioassay and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) were calculated as differences between baseline and second values divided by time duration (year).
Results
Among enrolled 156 study subjects, 74 (47.4%) had relapse/persistence. Baseline TSI bioassay values did not show significant differences between the two groups. However, the relapse/persistence group showed less decremental TSI bioassay in response to ATD than the remission group (–84.7 [TSI slope, –198.2 to 8.2] vs. –120.1 [TSI slope, –204.4 to –45.9], P=0.026), whereas the TBII slope was not significantly different between the two groups. The relapse/persistence group showed higher AUC1yr of TSI bioassay and TBII in the 1st year during ATD treatment than the remission group (AUC1yr for TSI bioassay, P=0.0125; AUC1yr for TBII, P=0.001).
Conclusion
Early changes in TSI bioassay can better predict prognosis of GD than TBII. Measurement of TSI bioassay at beginning and follow-up could help predict GD prognosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Enhanced predictive validity of integrative models for refractory hyperthyroidism considering baseline and early therapy characteristics: a prospective cohort study
    Xinpan Wang, Tiantian Li, Yue Li, Qiuyi Wang, Yun Cai, Zhixiao Wang, Yun Shi, Tao Yang, Xuqin Zheng
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-term Effect of Thyrotropin-binding Inhibitor Immunoglobulin on Atrial Fibrillation in Euthyroid Patients
    Jung-Chi Hsu, Kang-Chih Fan, Ting-Chuan Wang, Shu-Lin Chuang, Ying-Ting Chao, Ting-Tse Lin, Kuan-Chih Huang, Lian-Yu Lin, Lung-Chun Lin
    Endocrine Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Calcium & bone metabolism
Persistence with Denosumab in Male Osteoporosis Patients: A Real-World, Non-Interventional Multicenter Study
Chaiho Jeong, Jeongmin Lee, Jinyoung Kim, Jeonghoon Ha, Kwanhoon Jo, Yejee Lim, Mee Kyoung Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Tae-Seo Sohn, Ki-Ho Song, Moo Il Kang, Ki-Hyun Baek
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(2):260-268.   Published online April 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1663
  • 2,084 View
  • 117 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Persistence with denosumab in male patients has not been adequately investigated, although poor denosumab persistence is associated with a significant risk of rebound vertebral fractures.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated 294 Korean male osteoporosis patients treated with denosumab at three medical centers and examined their persistence with four doses of denosumab injection over 24 months of treatment. Persistence was defined as the extent to which a patient adhered to denosumab treatment in terms of the prescribed interval and dose, with a permissible gap of 8 weeks. For patients who missed their scheduled treatment appointment(s) during the follow-up period (i.e., no-shows), Cox proportional regression analysis was conducted to explore the factors associated with poor adherence. Several factors were considered, such as age, prior anti-osteoporotic drug use, the treatment provider’s medical specialty, the proximity to the medical center, and financial burdens of treatment.
Results
Out of 294 male patients, 77 (26.2%) completed all four sequential rounds of the denosumab treatment. Out of 217 patients who did not complete the denosumab treatment, 138 (63.6%) missed the scheduled treatment(s). Missing treatment was significantly associated with age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03), prior bisphosphonate use (OR, 0.76), and prescription by non-endocrinologists (OR, 2.24). Denosumab was stopped in 44 (20.3%) patients due to medical errors, in 24 (11.1%) patients due to a T-score improvement over –2.5, and in five (2.3%) patients due to expected dental procedures.
Conclusion
Our study showed that only one-fourth of Korean male osteoporosis patients were fully adherent to 24 months of denosumab treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Denosumab

    Reactions Weekly.2023; 1963(1): 206.     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Cholestyramine Use for Rapid Reversion to Euthyroid States in Patients with Thyrotoxicosis
Jeonghoon Ha, Kwanhoon Jo, Borami Kang, Min-Hee Kim, Dong-Jun Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2016;31(3):476-479.   Published online July 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2016.31.3.476
  • 4,148 View
  • 52 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

Cholestyramine (CS) is an ion exchange resin, which binds to iodothyronines and would lower serum thyroid hormone level. The use of CS added to conventional antithyroid drugs to control thyrotoxicosis has been applied since 1980's, and several studies indicate that using CS in combination with methimazole (MZ) produces a more rapid decline in serum thyroid hormones than with only MZ treatment. Our recent retrospective review of five patients taking high dose MZ and CS, compared to age-, gender-, initial free thyroxine (T4) level-, and MZ dose-matched 12 patients with MZ use only, showed more rapid decline of both free T4 and triiodothyronine levels without more adverse events. CS could be safely applicable short-term adjunctive therapy when first-line antithyroid medications are not enough to adequately control severe thyrotoxicosis or side effects of antithyroid drug would be of great concern.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Therapeutic plasma exchange for Graves’ disease in pregnancy
    Matthew Lumchee, Mimi Yue, Josephine Laurie, Adam Morton
    Obstetric Medicine.2023; 16(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Ventricular arrhythmias, antiarrhythmic therapy and thyroidal illness in advanced heart failure: a case report and review of the literature
    Fatima Alsalama, Salma Alzaabi, Cynthia Salloum, Marilyne Abi Younes, Feras Bader, Hussam Ghalib, Bassam Atallah
    Drugs & Therapy Perspectives.2023; 39(4): 147.     CrossRef
  • Amiodarone Induced Thyrotoxicosis and Treatment Complications in a Man With Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: A Case Report
    Marvin Wei Jie Chua, Shao Feng Mok
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Propylthiouracil-induced agranulocytosis as a rare complication of antithyroid drugs in a patient with Graves’ disease
    Patrícia Novais Rabelo, Paula Novais Rabelo, Allyne Fernanda de Paula, Samuel Amanso da Conceição, Daniela Pultrini Pereira de Oliveira Viggiano, Daniela Espíndola Antunes, Estela Muszkat Jatene, Sílvia Leda França Moura de Paula, Monike Lourenço Dias, Ma
    Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira.2019; 65(6): 755.     CrossRef
  • Notes on Trauma-Related Thyroid Storm in the Emergency Department
    Adam Morton
    The Journal of Emergency Medicine.2018; 54(2): e35.     CrossRef
  • Risk of embryopathies with use of antithyroidal medications
    Stine L. Andersen
    Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes & Obesity.2017; 24(5): 364.     CrossRef
  • Thiamazole

    Reactions Weekly.2017; 1644(1): 291.     CrossRef
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