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Byung Ki Choi  (Choi BK) 2 Articles
Renin-responsive Adrenal Adenoma with a Suspicious Abberant Adrenal Vein.
Ji Hyeon Ju, Woo Lee Jung, Jung Min Lee, Kun Ho Yoon, Bong Yun Cha, Ho Young Son, Dong Gu Kim, Eung Kook Kim, Byung Ki Choi
J Korean Endocr Soc. 2001;16(1):123-129.   Published online February 1, 2001
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A renin- or angiotensin-II responsive aldosterone producing tumor is a rare cause of primary hyperaldosteronism. This tumor can be identified by tests that show that the aldosterone producing adrenal tumor is not fully autonomous. In other words partially it is responsible for the stimulation of aldosterone secretion that results aldosterone levels in an increase in serum in response to the upright posture and spironolactone treatment. Furthermore, the urinary 18-hydroxycortisol level is within the normal range. Because of different responses to surgical removal, the differential diagnosis of the causes of primary aldosteronism can't be overemphasized even for rare causes of primary aldosteronism such as unilateral nodular hyperplasia or a renin-responsible aldosterone producing tumor. We should consider renin or angiotensin-II responsive adrenal adenoma in the differential diagnosis of primary aldosteronism when biochemical data shows atypical results. Here we present the first case in Korea of a renin-responsive aldosterone producing adrenal adenoma which was fully accessible and was successfully treated by surgical removal. Also, sampling for aldosterone secretion just above the insertion site in the left renal vein before surgery showed a suspiciously abberant left adrenal vein drainage into the IVC, This was very helpful information during adrenal vein ligation in laparoscopic adrenalectomy.
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2 Cases of Peripheral Nerve Tumors of Anterior Neck Simulating Thyroid Nodule.
Sung Kil Lim, Young Duk Song, Hyun Chul Lee, Kap Bum Huh, Kyung Rae Kim, Soo Yeon Nam, Byung Ki Choi, Sang Soo Chung, Kyung Wook Kim, So Rae Choi
J Korean Endocr Soc. 1998;13(4):640-645.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Peripheral nerve tumors are mostly benign and can arise on any nerve trunk or twig. Although peripheral nerve tumors can occur anywhere in the body, including the spinal roots and cauda equina, many cases are subcutaneous in location and present as a soft swelling, sometimes with a purplish discoloration of skin. There are two major catagories, schwannoma(neurilemmoma), and neurofibroma. Schwannomas are usually solitary and grow in the nerve sheath, rendering them relatively easy to dissect free. In contrast, neurofibromas tend to be multiple, grow in the endoneural substance, which renders them difficult to dissect, may undergo malignant changes, and are the hallmark of von Recklinghausens neurofibromatosis. Masses in the anterior part of neck may be initially thought to be thyroid nodule and then other cervical masses should be considered. The diagnosis rests on clinical suspicion and diagnostic support may be obtained by CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) and substraction angiography in the literature. After imaging, fine needle aspiration for cytology may be helpful. If they are resected unrecognized and/or without regard to their nerve origin, major and permanent nerve defects can unnecessarily occur. We experienced 2 cases of peripheral nerve tumors of anterior neck simulating a thyroid nodule.
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