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Bong Chul Jung  (Jung BC) 2 Articles
A Study About Correlation Between Urinary Androgen Metabolites and Bone Mineral Density in Psstmenopausal Women.
Kyoung Rae Kim, Ji Hyun Lee, Sung Kil Lim, Young Jun Won, Seok Ho Kwon, Bong Soo Cha, Young Duk Song, Hyun Chul Lee, Kap Bum Huh, Su Youn Nam, Bong Chul Jung
J Korean Endocr Soc. 1997;12(3):450-461.   Published online January 1, 2001
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BACKGROUND
Positive correlations between bone mass and androgen levels have been observed in premenopausal and postmenopausal women as well as in men. Androgen production was decreased in women with osteoporosis compared to that in age-matched controls. We hypothesized that androgen metabolism might be also deranged in osteoporosis. To clarify our hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between urinary metabolites of androgen and bone mineral density (BMD) in Korean postmenopausal osteoporotics. METHODS: We examined the anthropometry and bone turnover marker in 67 postmenopausal women. BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Serurn levels of estrone, estradiol, free testosterone were measured by radioirnmunoassay and serum level of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was measured by two site immunoradiometric assay. The urinary metabolites of androgen were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at Korean Institute of Science and Technology Doping Control Center. RESULTS: 1. Spinal BMD had a positive correlation with height (r 0.3049, p<0.05), weight (r=0.4114, p<0.001) and body mass index (BMI, r=0.2638, p<0,05). 2. Spinal and femoral neck BMD had no correlation with serum levels of estrone, estradiol and ten major urinary metabolites of androgen, but serum free testosterone had positive correlation with spinal BMD (r=0.3622, p<0.01) and SHBG had negative correlation with femoral neck BMD (r=-0.2625, p< (0.05). 3. Serum free testosterone in osteoporotics was lower than non-osteoporotics with spinal BMD (p<0.05) and SHBG in patients with osteopenia was higher than non-osteopenic subjects with femoral neck BMD (p <0.05). 4. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, weight and serum free testosterone were statistically significant for spinal BMD (R =0.3072). As for femoral neck BMD, weight was the independent determinant (R 0.1307). 5. Serum level of osteo#ealcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline/creatinine had a positive correlation with urinary 11-ketoandrosterone (p<0.05). SHBG was positive correlation with osteocalcin (r=0.3190, p<0.05). 6. Serum free testosterone (r=-0.2740, p<0.05) decreased with aging. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that androgen metabolism is not deranged in osteoporotics, but serum free testosterone is important than estrogen on postmenopausal osteoporosis after 5-10 years menopause.
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Clinical use of Urinary Androgen Metabolites in Hyperprolactinemia.
Kyoung Rae Kim, Sung Kil Lim, Young Duk Song, Hyun Chul Lee, Kap Bum Huh, Eun Sook Kim, Su Youn Nam, Eun Jig Lee, Bong Chul Jung, Byeong Kee Choi, Jae Ho Shin
J Korean Endocr Soc. 1997;12(3):443-449.   Published online January 1, 2001
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  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Hyperprolactinemia has been linked with hyperandrogenism and hirsutism in some women. High plasma Dihydroandrosterone and DHA-S levels were reported in patients with hyperprolactinemia and a dissociation of adrenal androgen and cortisol secretion occurs in normal subjects. The mechanism has not been elucidated, but it has been suggested that pituitary factors other than ACTH modulate adrenal androgen synthesis, One candidate hormone is prolactin. Adrenal tissue has been found to possess prolactin receptors and prolactin has been shown to act synergistically with ACTH and lowers the activity of the enzyme 5a-reductase or 3B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3B-HSD). The aim of this study was to investigate the secretion of adrenal androgen metabolites in patients with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia and prolactinoma and to deterrnine the relationship with prolactin and androgens. METHODS: We measured 24 hour-urinary DHEA, androstenedione, androsterone, pregnenolone, tetrahydrocorticoid and cortisol in 16 normal controls and 5 patients with idiopathic hyperprolac-tinemia (HP) and 12 patients with prolactonoma in the early follicular phase. RESULTS: Urinary DHEA, AD (androsteredione), and androsterone, the metabolites of adrenal androgen, were significantly higher in both patients with idiopathic HP and prolactinoma compared with those in normal controls (p<0.05), whereas they were not different in both disease groups. Urinary pregnenolone levels, early metabolite of adrenal steroid synthesis, were lower in patients. In contrast, urinary tetrahydorcortisol and cortisol were higher in patients compared to controls. There was no difference in DHEA:androsterone ratio between patients and controls. And there were no correlation between prolactin levels and the levels of androgenic metabolites or clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION: Prolactin has a tropic effct on the secretion of androgens and steroids by the adrenal cortex. But prolactin levels were not correlated with androgen levels or clinical symptoms (amenorrhea), and it might have little effect on lowering the activity of 3B-HSD.
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