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Adriana Coppola 1 Article
Clinical Study
Effects of a Portfolio-Mediterranean Diet and a Mediterranean Diet with or without a Sterol-Enriched Yogurt in Individuals with Hypercholesterolemia
Yvelise Ferro, Elisa Mazza, Mariantonietta Salvati, Emma Santariga, Salvatore Giampà, Rocco Spagnuolo, Patrizia Doldo, Roberta Pujia, Adriana Coppola, Carmine Gazzaruso, Arturo Pujia, Tiziana Montalcini
Endocrinol Metab. 2020;35(2):298-307.   Published online June 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.35.2.298
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  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Background
A growing number of functional foods have been proposed to reduce cholesterol levels and the Portfolio Diet, which includes a combination of plant sterols, fibres, nuts, and soy protein, reduces low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) from 20% to 30% in individuals with hyperlipidaemia. In this pilot study, the aim was to investigate whether a Mediterranean Diet incorporating a new and simple combination of cholesterol-lowering foods, excluding soy and nuts (namely the Portfolio-Mediterranean Diet), would reduce LDL-C levels, in the short-term, better than a Mediterranean Diet plus a sterol-enriched yogurt or a Mediterranean Diet alone.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated 24 individuals on a Portfolio-Mediterranean Diet and 48 matched individuals on a Mediterranean Diet with or without a sterol-enriched yogurt (24 each groups) as controls.
Results
At follow-up (after 48±12 days), we observed an LDL reduction of 21±4, 23±4, and 44±4 mg/dL in the Mediterranean Diet alone, Mediterranean Diet plus yogurt and Portfolio-Mediterranean Diet respectively (P<0.001).
Conclusion
A Portfolio-Mediterranean Diet, incorporating a new combination of functional foods such as oats or barley, plant sterols, chitosan, and green tea but not soy and nuts, may reduce LDL of 25% in the short term in individuals with hypercholesterolemia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Heliyon.2023; 9(8): e18239.     CrossRef
  • Application of small angle X‐ray scattering in exploring the effect of edible oils with different unsaturation FAs on bioaccessibility of stigmasterol oleate
    Ying Wang, Tao Wang, Zhangtie Wang, Yiwen Guo, Ruijie Liu, Ming Chang
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Phyto-Enrichment of Yogurt to Control Hypercholesterolemia: A Functional Approach
    Harsh Kumar, Kanchan Bhardwaj, Natália Cruz-Martins, Ruchi Sharma, Shahida Anusha Siddiqui, Daljeet Singh Dhanjal, Reena Singh, Chirag Chopra, Adriana Dantas, Rachna Verma, Noura S. Dosoky, Dinesh Kumar
    Molecules.2022; 27(11): 3479.     CrossRef
  • Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Its Current Diagnostics and Treatment Possibilities: A Literature Analysis
    Kristina Zubielienė, Gintarė Valterytė, Neda Jonaitienė, Diana Žaliaduonytė, Vytautas Zabiela
    Medicina.2022; 58(11): 1665.     CrossRef
  • Mediterranean Diet a Potential Strategy against SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Narrative Review
    Yvelise Ferro, Roberta Pujia, Samantha Maurotti, Giada Boragina, Angela Mirarchi, Patrizia Gnagnarella, Elisa Mazza
    Medicina.2021; 57(12): 1389.     CrossRef

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